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Jeffersonian democracy in North Carolina, 1789-1816

Author: Delbert Harold Gilpatrick; J Edwin Hendricks
Publisher: New York : Octagon Books, 1967.
Series: Columbia studies in the social sciences, no. 344.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Gilpatrick, Delbert Harold, 1892-1981.
Jeffersonian democracy in North Carolina, 1789-1816.
New York, Octagon Books, 1967
(OCoLC)756452046
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Delbert Harold Gilpatrick; J Edwin Hendricks
OCLC Number: 282675
Notes: Reprint, with new bibliographical supplement by J. Edwin Hendricks of 1931 ed., which was issued also as thesis, Columbia University.
Description: xvi, 257 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: ch. I. Economic and political background, 1776-1789 --
Political cleavage under the Articles of Confederation --
Divisions upon geographic, economic and social lines in North Carolina --
Tidewater region --
Upland region --
Cape Fear country as a connecting link --
Conservative and radical leaders --
The North Carolina Constitution of 1776 --
Struggle over the Federal Constitution, 1787-1789 --
ch. II. Opposition to the Federalist Program and Beginnings of the Jeffersonian Party, 1790-1797 --
Early participation in the new government --
A slight Federalist inclination --
Dislike of Hamiltonian measures --
The disgruntled legislature of 1790 --
Presidential election of 1792 --
Alexander Martin succeeds Samuel Johnston as United States Senator --
Changed type of congressional representation after 1793 --
Pro-French feeling --
Violation of neutrality --
Likelihood of war with England and brief popularity of central government, 1794 --
Hostility to Jay Treaty --
Presidential election of 1796 --
Hopes of North Carolina Federalists --
State debts and renewed hostility to central government --
ch. III. A swing toward Federalism and the election of 1800, 1798-1800 --
French outrages --
Opposition of North Carolina delegation in Congress to anti-French measures --
Turbulent congressional campaign of 1798 --
Temporary gains of Federalists --
Addresses to John Adams --
The Federalist legislature of 1798 --
Alien and Sedition Acts --
Kentucky Resolutions --
Beginnings of a Republican press --
Partisan journalism in Raleigh --
Federalist tendencies of the legislature of 1799 --
Fears of Jefferson and Madison regarding North Carolina --
Congressional election of 1800 --
Presidential election of 1800 --
Enthusiasm for Jefferson --
ch. IV. A decade of rampant Republicanism, 1800-1810 --
The Republican legislature of 1800 --
Republican legislatures, 1800-1810 --
Republican governors --
Republican senators --
Party battles over the state printer, 1800-1811 --
Republican economy and the University of North Carolina --
Republican economy, the governor's salary and the governor's residence --
The Court Law of 1806 --
Early banks as partisan issues --
Questions not decided upon party lines --
Legislative attitude on national questions --
Judiciary Act of 1801 --
The Louisiana Purchase --
Presidential election of 1804 --
The Chesapeake and the Leopard, 1807 --
Endorsement of Jefferson and the Embargo --
Presidential election of 1808 --
Republican triumphs in congressional elections, 1803-1810 --
Partisan journalism --
Fourth of July celebrations --
ch. V. Republicanism and "Mr. Madison's War," 1811-1816 --
Embargo --
Non-Intercourse --
Domestic manufactures --
Electoral law of 1811 --
Presidential election of 1812 --
Sentimental support of war rather than financial --
Congressional elections of 1813 --
Federalists' inability to make political capital of the war --
Invasion of North Carolina, July 1813 --
Neglect of North Carolina's coast defense by the central government, 1813 --
David Stone --
Coastal defense unavailable as a partisan issue, 1814 --
Republican caucus --
More liberal financial support of the war --
Reaction to the Treaty of Ghent --
Congressional election of 1815 and hopeless situation of the Federalists --
Legislative reaction to the Hartford Convention --
Endorsement of Madison --
Electoral Law of 1815 --
Presidential election of 1816 --
New problems --
New leaders --
Conclusion.
Series Title: Columbia studies in the social sciences, no. 344.
Responsibility: by Delbert Harold Gilpatrick, with a new bibliographical supplement by J. Edwin Hendricks.

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schema:description"ch. I. Economic and political background, 1776-1789 -- Political cleavage under the Articles of Confederation -- Divisions upon geographic, economic and social lines in North Carolina -- Tidewater region -- Upland region -- Cape Fear country as a connecting link -- Conservative and radical leaders -- The North Carolina Constitution of 1776 -- Struggle over the Federal Constitution, 1787-1789 -- ch. II. Opposition to the Federalist Program and Beginnings of the Jeffersonian Party, 1790-1797 -- Early participation in the new government -- A slight Federalist inclination -- Dislike of Hamiltonian measures -- The disgruntled legislature of 1790 -- Presidential election of 1792 -- Alexander Martin succeeds Samuel Johnston as United States Senator -- Changed type of congressional representation after 1793 -- Pro-French feeling -- Violation of neutrality -- Likelihood of war with England and brief popularity of central government, 1794 -- Hostility to Jay Treaty -- Presidential election of 1796 -- Hopes of North Carolina Federalists -- State debts and renewed hostility to central government -- ch. III. A swing toward Federalism and the election of 1800, 1798-1800 -- French outrages -- Opposition of North Carolina delegation in Congress to anti-French measures -- Turbulent congressional campaign of 1798 -- Temporary gains of Federalists -- Addresses to John Adams -- The Federalist legislature of 1798 -- Alien and Sedition Acts -- Kentucky Resolutions -- Beginnings of a Republican press -- Partisan journalism in Raleigh -- Federalist tendencies of the legislature of 1799 -- Fears of Jefferson and Madison regarding North Carolina -- Congressional election of 1800 -- Presidential election of 1800 -- Enthusiasm for Jefferson -- ch. IV. A decade of rampant Republicanism, 1800-1810 -- The Republican legislature of 1800 -- Republican legislatures, 1800-1810 -- Republican governors -- Republican senators -- Party battles over the state printer, 1800-1811 -- Republican economy and the University of North Carolina -- Republican economy, the governor's salary and the governor's residence -- The Court Law of 1806 -- Early banks as partisan issues -- Questions not decided upon party lines -- Legislative attitude on national questions -- Judiciary Act of 1801 -- The Louisiana Purchase -- Presidential election of 1804 -- The Chesapeake and the Leopard, 1807 -- Endorsement of Jefferson and the Embargo -- Presidential election of 1808 -- Republican triumphs in congressional elections, 1803-1810 -- Partisan journalism -- Fourth of July celebrations -- ch. V. Republicanism and "Mr. Madison's War," 1811-1816 -- Embargo -- Non-Intercourse -- Domestic manufactures -- Electoral law of 1811 -- Presidential election of 1812 -- Sentimental support of war rather than financial -- Congressional elections of 1813 -- Federalists' inability to make political capital of the war -- Invasion of North Carolina, July 1813 -- Neglect of North Carolina's coast defense by the central government, 1813 -- David Stone -- Coastal defense unavailable as a partisan issue, 1814 -- Republican caucus -- More liberal financial support of the war -- Reaction to the Treaty of Ghent -- Congressional election of 1815 and hopeless situation of the Federalists -- Legislative reaction to the Hartford Convention -- Endorsement of Madison -- Electoral Law of 1815 -- Presidential election of 1816 -- New problems -- New leaders -- Conclusion."@en
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