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John Ashbery and American poetry

Author: David Herd
Publisher: New York : Palgrave, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
David Herd provides a critical language for a ppreciating the beauty and complexity of Ashbery's writing. Presenting the poet in all his forms--avant-garde, nostalgic, sublime, and camp--he demonstrates that the inventiveness of Ashbery's work has always been underpinned by the poet's desire to fit the poem to its occasion. Tracing Ashbery's development from his origins in the dazzling artistic world of 1950s New  Read more...
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Named Person: John Ashbery; John Ashbery
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Herd
ISBN: 0312239319 9780312239312
OCLC Number: 45207968
Description: viii, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: John Ashbery's sense of occasion --
Two scenes: the early poetry and its backgrounds --
The art of life: collaboration and the New York School --
An American in Paris: The Tennis Court Oath and the poetics of exile --
Forms of action: experiment and declaration in Rivers and Mountains and The Double Dream of Spring --
From poetry to prose: the sceptical tradition of Three Poems --
John Ashbery in conversation: the communicative value of Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror and Houseboat Days --
John Ashbery and friends: the poet and his communities in Shadow Train and A Wave --
'And later, after the twister': the sense of an ending in recent Ashbery.
Responsibility: David Herd.
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Abstract:

David Herd provides a critical language for a ppreciating the beauty and complexity of Ashbery's writing. Presenting the poet in all his forms--avant-garde, nostalgic, sublime, and camp--he demonstrates that the inventiveness of Ashbery's work has always been underpinned by the poet's desire to fit the poem to its occasion. Tracing Ashbery's development from his origins in the dazzling artistic world of 1950s New York, Herd portrays Ashbery as both an American pragmatist writing in the spirit of William James, and a committed literary internationalist learning from Boris Pasternak and the Russian avant-garde. His poetry is shown to be alive to such culturally defining issues as the growth of mass culture, the absence of God, the war in Vietnam, the emergence of AIDS, the erosion of tradition, and the decline of the avant-garde. Herd compares Ashbery's responses to the work of, among others, Robert Lowell, John Berryman, Kenneth Koch, and Frank O'Hara.--Publisher's description.

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