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John Hancock : merchant king and American patriot

Author: Harlow G Unger
Publisher: New York : John Wiley & Sons, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"He was a rich, powerful aristocrat, a merchant king who loved English culture and fashion, and, above all, he was a loyal British subject with ambitions of a lordship and a grand retirement estate in England. There simply was no doubt about it: John Hancock was the least likely man in Boston to start a rebellion. How, then, did this Tory patrician become one of the staunchest supporters of the American
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Unger, Harlow G., 1931-
John Hancock.
New York : John Wiley & Sons, c2000
(OCoLC)606589089
Named Person: John Hancock; John Hancock, Politiker 1737-1793.
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Harlow G Unger
ISBN: 0471332097 9780471332091
OCLC Number: 42810802
Description: xvi, 383 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The boy on beacon hill (1737-1750) --
The merchant king (1724-1750) --
The merchant prince (1750-1764) --
Of stamps and taxes (1764-1765) --
"Mad rant and porterly reviling" (1765) --
A hero by circumstance (1765-1768) --
"Idol of the mob" (1768-1770) --
"Tea in a trice" (1770-1773) --
High treason (1774-1775) --
President of Congress (1775-1776) --
Founding father (1776) --
President of the United States (1776-1777) --
A model major general (1777-1780) --
His excellency the governor (1780-1785) --
Hancock! Hancock! Even to the end (1785-1793) --
Epilogue --
Notes --
Selected bibliography of principal sources --
Index.
Responsibility: Harlow Giles Unger.
More information:

Abstract:

"He was a rich, powerful aristocrat, a merchant king who loved English culture and fashion, and, above all, he was a loyal British subject with ambitions of a lordship and a grand retirement estate in England. There simply was no doubt about it: John Hancock was the least likely man in Boston to start a rebellion. How, then, did this Tory patrician become one of the staunchest supporters of the American Revolution?".

"As Unger reveals in this portrait, Hancock was one of the most paradoxical figures of his time. Arguably the wealthiest man in the American colonies, he unabashedly reveled in his riches, adoring all the foppish trappings he could buy. But his commitment to individual liberty eventually transformed him into a fervent revolutionary, venerated equally by his establishment peers at Harvard as he was by the rebels - the Minutemen who did the fighting and the Boston street mobs who declared him their hero even as they burned the homes of other aristocrats. To repay their respect, he sacrificed his fortune and risked death by hanging to win independence from the British.

A brilliant orator, he combined his wealth and political skills to unite Boston's merchant and working classes into an armed might that forced Britain's vaunted professional army to evacuate Boston, assuring the success of the Revolution." "Here is the story of the man with the most recognizable signature in American history. Intertwining Hancock's story with that of the colorful Samuel Adams, his fellow Bostonian (and Harvard man) who was both comrade in arms and political enemy, Unger etches a finely drawn portrait of one of the Revolutionary War's greatest - and possibly least known - leaders."--BOOK JACKET.

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