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John le Carré

著者: Lynn Beene
出版: New York : Twayne Publishers, ©1992.
シリーズ: Twayne's English authors series, TEAS 496.
エディション/フォーマット:   book_printbook : Englishすべてのエディションとフォーマットを見る
データベース:WorldCat
概要:
In John le Carre's artful espionage novels, the most prominent "spy" might well be the author himself, for throughout his fiction readers see a worried, conscientious man peering into the deformed hearts of those who would betray his people and warning us of their trickery. Le Carre (the pen name of David John Moore Cornwell) has amassed broad popular and critical appeal by exploring difficult subjects while keeping  続きを読む
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ジャンル/形式: Criticism, interpretation, etc
その他のフォーマット: Online version:
Beene, Lynn.
John le Carré.
New York : Twayne Publishers, ©1992
(OCoLC)607066529
関連の人物: John Le Carré; John Le Carré; John Le Carré; John Le Carré
資料の種類: インターネット資料
ドキュメントの種類: 図書, インターネットリソース
すべての著者/寄与者: Lynn Beene
ISBN: 0805770135 9780805770131
OCLC No.: 26054438
物理形態: xiii, 179 pages ; 23 cm.
コンテンツ: Ch. 1. Creating Secret Sharers --
Ch. 2. A Brief History of a Sentimental Man --
Ch. 3. Cold War Fiction --
Ch. 4. David and Jonathan --
Ch. 5. The Quest for Karla --
Ch. 6. The Story within the Story within the Story --
Ch. 7. Shaking the Tree: The Achievement of John le Carre.
シリーズタイトル: Twayne's English authors series, TEAS 496.
責任者: LynnDianne Beene.

概要:

In John le Carre's artful espionage novels, the most prominent "spy" might well be the author himself, for throughout his fiction readers see a worried, conscientious man peering into the deformed hearts of those who would betray his people and warning us of their trickery. Le Carre (the pen name of David John Moore Cornwell) has amassed broad popular and critical appeal by exploring difficult subjects while keeping his books engaging, lucid, and within the boundaries of the genre he now defines. Using his constant theme of the meretricious relationship of love and betrayal, he exploits the conventions of espionage fiction to show that no absolute standards of public or personal conduct exist, that humanism, no matter how ponderously examined, cannot avoid inhumanity. In this comprehensive study of one of Britain's most prolific novelists (and alumnus of its espionage activities), LynnDianne Beene identifies le Carre's considerable talent at manipulating the espionage genre to bring it in line with his relentless moral vision. Beene finds that the best of le Carre's novels - The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1964), Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974), Smiley's People (1980), and The Little Drummer Girl (1983) - borrow some conventions from popular thrillers but are essentially literary fiction. Although le Carre's thrillers, like the work of genre novelists, include resourceful agents, animated narratives, technical espionage devices, and entangled political affairs, his characters, Beene contends, are more reminiscent of Charles Dickens's best caricatures: their actions remind readers that decency, love, and the line between betrayal and loyalty are precarious. In the tradition of Joseph Conrad, Somerset Maugham, and Graham Greene, le Carre creates largely convincing characters whose often unshakable faith in conspiracy leads uncontrollably to treachery. Although often efficient, le Carre's people are pawns in an espionage chess game where betrayal is the basic tactic: once caught in the game, Beene observes, their only escapes are betrayal, death, or, worse, self-realization and angst, as is the case with the perennial character George Smiley. Le Carre is singular among contemporary writers because, Beene argues, he exchanges action, the mainstay of espionage fiction and that which makes the genre pure entertainment, for psychological debate and ethical paralysis. Le Carre writes of an "our side" indistinguishable from "theirs": "we" can be incompetent, fumbling, and mindlessly destructive; "they" can be decent, conscientious, and dedicated. Beene judiciously avoids literary categories in this straightforward, chronological analysis of le Carre, ranking him with the best of Britain's nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century novelists but not disregarding the fact that he is a writer of his time, of the cold war's technological gadgetry and often absurd political liaisons. Her portrait will prove of particular interest to students of what is now a containable literary period: the cold war, 1945-1989.

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