doorgaan naar inhoud
John Marshall : definer of a nation Voorbeeldweergave van dit item
SluitenVoorbeeldweergave van dit item
Bezig met controle...

John Marshall : definer of a nation

Auteur: Jean Edward Smith
Uitgever: New York : H. Holt & Co., 1996.
Editie/Formaat:   Boek : Biografie : Engels : 1st edAlle edities en materiaalsoorten bekijken.
Database:WorldCat
Samenvatting:
When, in 1801, John Marshall became Chief Justice of the United States, the Supreme Court was little more than a clause in the Constitution and a gaggle of conflicting opinions. For the next thirty-five years, Marshall was to mold the Court into a major force. Under his leadership, it learned to speak with one voice, becoming a powerful and respected third branch of government. It enunciated the principle of  Meer lezen...
Beoordeling:

(nog niet beoordeeld) 0 met beoordelingen - U bent de eerste

Onderwerpen
Meer in deze trant

 

Zoeken naar een in de bibliotheek beschikbaar exemplaar

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Bibliotheken met dit item worden gezocht…

Details

Genre/Vorm: Biography
Genoemd persoon: John Marshall; John Marshall; John Marshall; John (Politiker) Marshall
Genre: Biografie
Soort document: Boek
Alle auteurs / medewerkers: Jean Edward Smith
ISBN: 080501389X 9780805013894
OCLC-nummer: 34576755
Opmerkingen: "A Marian Wood book."
Beschrijving: xi, 736 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Inhoud: Marshall's Virginia Heritage --
Soldier of the Revolution --
Student and Suitor --
Husband, Lawyer, Legislator --
The Fight for Ratification --
At the Richmond Bar --
Virginia Federalist --
Mission to Paris (The XYZ Affair) --
To Congress from Richmond --
Secretary of State --
Opinion of the Court --
The Gathering Storm --
Marbury v. Madison --
The Center Holds --
Treason Defined --
Yazoo --
"A Band of Brothers" --
National Supremacy --
Steamboats --
The Chief Justice and Old Hickory.
Verantwoordelijkheid: Jean Edward Smith.
Meer informatie:

Fragment:

When, in 1801, John Marshall became Chief Justice of the United States, the Supreme Court was little more than a clause in the Constitution and a gaggle of conflicting opinions. For the next thirty-five years, Marshall was to mold the Court into a major force. Under his leadership, it learned to speak with one voice, becoming a powerful and respected third branch of government. It enunciated the principle of judicial review, established itself as the arbiter of constitutional authority, and affirmed the Constitution as an instrument of the people, not of the states. As a result, the implied powers of the federal government took on definition, the workings of the national government gained authority, and the economic system was made viable through a sophisticated understanding of the commerce clause. In truth, if George Washington founded the nation, John Marshall defined it. But who was this son of yeoman Virginia stock, this soldier who endured the terrible suffering at Valley Forge, this lawyer who was a moving force behind Virginia's ratification of the Constitution, this diplomat who outwitted Talleyrand and thereby raised the profile of a raw young country in the capitals of Europe? Confidant of presidents, friend to the founding fathers, statesman, envoy, and legislator: who was this man who gave up a flourishing legal practice to take on the thankless task of shaping the Court and went on to make it into the institution we see today? Working from primary sources, Jean Edward Smith draws an elegant portrait of this remarkable man. Lawyer, jurist, scholar; soldier, comrade, friend; and, most especially, lover of fine Madeira, good food, and animated table talk: the Marshall who emerges from this book is as noteworthy for his very human qualities as for his piercing intellect, and perhaps most extraordinary for his talents as a leader of men and a molder of consensus.

Beoordelingen

Beoordelingen door gebruikers
Beoordelingen van GoodReads worden opgehaald...
Bezig met opvragen DOGObooks-reviews...

Tags

U bent de eerste.
Bevestig deze aanvraag

Misschien heeft u dit item reeds aangevraagd. Selecteer a.u.b. Ok als u toch wilt doorgaan met deze aanvraag.

Gekoppelde data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/34576755>
library:oclcnum"34576755"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/100204775>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1755"
schema:deathDate"1835"
schema:familyName"Marshall"
schema:givenName"John (Politiker)"
schema:givenName"John"
schema:name"Marshall, John (Politiker)"
schema:name"Marshall, John, 1755-1835"
schema:name"Marshall, John, 1755-1835."
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/144945827>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Etats-Unis. Supreme Court."
schema:name"United States. Supreme Court."
schema:name"United States. Supreme Court"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Marshall's Virginia Heritage -- Soldier of the Revolution -- Student and Suitor -- Husband, Lawyer, Legislator -- The Fight for Ratification -- At the Richmond Bar -- Virginia Federalist -- Mission to Paris (The XYZ Affair) -- To Congress from Richmond -- Secretary of State -- Opinion of the Court -- The Gathering Storm -- Marbury v. Madison -- The Center Holds -- Treason Defined -- Yazoo -- "A Band of Brothers" -- National Supremacy -- Steamboats -- The Chief Justice and Old Hickory."@en
schema:description"When, in 1801, John Marshall became Chief Justice of the United States, the Supreme Court was little more than a clause in the Constitution and a gaggle of conflicting opinions. For the next thirty-five years, Marshall was to mold the Court into a major force. Under his leadership, it learned to speak with one voice, becoming a powerful and respected third branch of government. It enunciated the principle of judicial review, established itself as the arbiter of constitutional authority, and affirmed the Constitution as an instrument of the people, not of the states. As a result, the implied powers of the federal government took on definition, the workings of the national government gained authority, and the economic system was made viable through a sophisticated understanding of the commerce clause. In truth, if George Washington founded the nation, John Marshall defined it. But who was this son of yeoman Virginia stock, this soldier who endured the terrible suffering at Valley Forge, this lawyer who was a moving force behind Virginia's ratification of the Constitution, this diplomat who outwitted Talleyrand and thereby raised the profile of a raw young country in the capitals of Europe? Confidant of presidents, friend to the founding fathers, statesman, envoy, and legislator: who was this man who gave up a flourishing legal practice to take on the thankless task of shaping the Court and went on to make it into the institution we see today? Working from primary sources, Jean Edward Smith draws an elegant portrait of this remarkable man. Lawyer, jurist, scholar; soldier, comrade, friend; and, most especially, lover of fine Madeira, good food, and animated table talk: the Marshall who emerges from this book is as noteworthy for his very human qualities as for his piercing intellect, and perhaps most extraordinary for his talents as a leader of men and a molder of consensus."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/807312348>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"John Marshall : definer of a nation"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Venster sluiten

Meld u aan bij WorldCat 

Heeft u geen account? U kunt eenvoudig een nieuwe gratis account aanmaken.