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The Johnstown flood,

Author: David G McCullough
Publisher: New York, Simon and Schuster [1968]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A history of the 1889 flood that killed over 2,000 people in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Based on letters, diaries, historical records, and interviews with survivors.
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Genre/Form: History
Personal narratives
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
McCullough, David G.
Johnstown flood.
New York, Simon and Schuster [1968]
(OCoLC)582664015
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David G McCullough
OCLC Number: 284611
Description: 302 p. illus., maps (part col.), ports. 24 cm.
Contents: The sky was red --
Sailboats on the mountain --
"There's a man came from the lake." --
Rush of the torrent --
"Run for your lives!" --
A message from Mr. Pitcairn --
In the valley of death --
"No pen can describe..." --
"Our misery is the work of man."
Responsibility: by David G. McCullough.

Abstract:

A history of the 1889 flood that killed over 2,000 people in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Based on letters, diaries, historical records, and interviews with survivors.

At the end of the nineteenth century, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was a booming coal-and-steel town filled with hardworking families striving for a piece of the nation's burgeoning industrial prosperity. In the mountains above Johnstown, an old earth dam had been hastily rebuilt to create a lake for an exclusive summer resort patronized by the tycoons of that same industrial prosperity, among them Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Mellon. Despite repeated warnings of possible danger, nothing was done about the dam. Then came May 31, 1889, when the dam burst, sending a wall of water thundering down the mountain, smashing through Johnstown, and killing more than 2,000 people. It was a tragedy that became a national scandal. This book paints the classic portrait of life in nineteenth-century America, of overwhelming confidence, of energy, and of tragedy. It offers a powerful historical lesson for our century and all times: the danger of assuming that because people are in positions of responsibility they are necessarily behaving responsibly. -- from Back Cover

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Linked Data


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schema:description"The sky was red -- Sailboats on the mountain -- "There's a man came from the lake." -- Rush of the torrent -- "Run for your lives!" -- A message from Mr. Pitcairn -- In the valley of death -- "No pen can describe..." -- "Our misery is the work of man.""
schema:description"At the end of the nineteenth century, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was a booming coal-and-steel town filled with hardworking families striving for a piece of the nation's burgeoning industrial prosperity. In the mountains above Johnstown, an old earth dam had been hastily rebuilt to create a lake for an exclusive summer resort patronized by the tycoons of that same industrial prosperity, among them Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Mellon. Despite repeated warnings of possible danger, nothing was done about the dam. Then came May 31, 1889, when the dam burst, sending a wall of water thundering down the mountain, smashing through Johnstown, and killing more than 2,000 people. It was a tragedy that became a national scandal. This book paints the classic portrait of life in nineteenth-century America, of overwhelming confidence, of energy, and of tragedy. It offers a powerful historical lesson for our century and all times: the danger of assuming that because people are in positions of responsibility they are necessarily behaving responsibly. -- from Back Cover"
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