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Joseph Anton : [a memoir]

Author: Salman Rushdie; Sam Dastor
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Random House Audio : Books on Tape, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
On February 14, 1989, Valentine's Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been "sentenced to death" by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being "against Islam, the Prophet and the Qur'an." So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Audiobooks
Biography
Personal narratives
Named Person: Salman Rushdie
Material Type: Biography, Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Salman Rushdie; Sam Dastor
ISBN: 9780449807811 : 9780449807835 : 0449807819 0449807835
OCLC Number: 779261141
Notes: Subtitle from container.
Unabridged.
Compact discs.
Credits: Director, John Foley.
Performer(s): Read by Sam Dastor ; prologue read by the author.
Description: 22 sound discs (26 hr., 58 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Responsibility: Salman Rushdie.

Abstract:

On February 14, 1989, Valentine's Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been "sentenced to death" by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being "against Islam, the Prophet and the Qur'an." So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground, moving from house to house, with the constant presence of an armed police protection team. He was asked to choose an alias that the police could call him by. He thought of writers he loved and combinations of their names ; then it came to him : Conrad and Chekhov -- Joseph Anton. How do a writer and his family live with the threat of murder for more than nine years? How does he go on working? How does he fall in and out of love? How does despair shape his thoughts and actions, how and why does he stumble, how does he learn to fight back? In this remarkable memoir Rushdie tells that story for the first time; the story of one of the crucial battles, in our time, for freedom of speech.--Container

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Linked Data


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