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Joseph E. Lowery interview, 1970 Oct. 19.

Author: Joseph E Lowery
Edition/Format:   Book : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Reflects on his early activities with the a voter registration efforts in Alabama as a student and young Methodist minister. Explains how, why, and by whom the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was created; identifies and evaluates key SCLC personnel. Assesses SCLC's first attempt to employ nonviolent tactics in the Montgomery bus boycotts, as well as the theological rationale behind nonviolence in  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Interviews
Oral histories
Named Person: Ralph Abernathy; Eugene Connor; Martin Luther King, Jr.; Lester Maddox; George C Wallace
Material Type: Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Joseph E Lowery
OCLC Number: 853520984
Notes: The material described in this catalog record is located in the collections of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Description: Transcript : 53 p.

Abstract:

Reflects on his early activities with the a voter registration efforts in Alabama as a student and young Methodist minister. Explains how, why, and by whom the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was created; identifies and evaluates key SCLC personnel. Assesses SCLC's first attempt to employ nonviolent tactics in the Montgomery bus boycotts, as well as the theological rationale behind nonviolence in general. Recalls his role and that of others in the Montgomery bus boycotts, especially Martin Luther King, Jr., and Ralph Abernathy. Evaluates SCLC's campaigns against housing and employment discrimination in the North, notably Operation Breadbasket in Chicago in 1965. Cites the conditions that led to SCLC's focus on Birmingham, especially the resistance offered by police chief Bull Connor, and the development of the Birmingham Movement. Contrasts the difficulties Blacks encountered desegregating facilities in Montgomery and Birmingham with the ease of similar progress in Mobile, Ala. Gives his impressions of southern governors George Wallace of Alabama and Lester Maddox of Georgia, comparing their styles, significance, tactics, and political ambitions. Discusses the effect of Martin Luther King's death on the direction of SCLC and the civil rights movement, and offers his opinions on the conspiracy theories about King's assassination. Stresses the need for Blacks to become more involved in politics, labor organizing, welfare reform, and the anti-Vietnam War movement. Interviewer: Robert Wright. No tape available.

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Linked Data


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