skip to content
The journals of Lewis and Clark Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark; Frank Bergon
Publisher: New York : Penguin Books, 2003.
Series: Penguin classics.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank-not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary,  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark; Frank Bergon
ISBN: 0142437360 9780142437360
OCLC Number: 51606654
Notes: Originally published: Viking Penguin Inc., c1989.
Includes index.
Description: xlvi, 505 p. : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
Contents: Up the Missouri --
Meeting the Lakota --
Winter among the Mandan --
The great unknown --
The thundering falls --
In search of the Shoshone --
Across the Great Divide --
Down the rapids --
Winter at Fort Clatsop --
The start for home --
Lewis's shortcut --
The homestretch.
Series Title: Penguin classics.
Other Titles: Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
Responsibility: edited and with an introduction by Frank Bergon.

Abstract:

In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank-not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history. With 2003 marking the beginning of the Lewis and Clark expedition bicentennial celebration, this journal is now reissued in a beautiful new Penguin Classics package.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/51606654>
library:oclcnum"51606654"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/51606654>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2003"
schema:description"Up the Missouri -- Meeting the Lakota -- Winter among the Mandan -- The great unknown -- The thundering falls -- In search of the Shoshone -- Across the Great Divide -- Down the rapids -- Winter at Fort Clatsop -- The start for home -- Lewis's shortcut -- The homestretch."
schema:description"In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank-not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history. With 2003 marking the beginning of the Lewis and Clark expedition bicentennial celebration, this journal is now reissued in a beautiful new Penguin Classics package."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/538138>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The journals of Lewis and Clark"
schema:numberOfPages"505"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.