skip to content
The journals of Lewis and Clark Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The journals of Lewis and Clark

Author: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark; Bernard De Voto
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., ©1997.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank - not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier." "He commissioned his young  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Lewis, Meriwether, 1774-1809.
Journals of Lewis and Clark.
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., ©1997
(DLC) 97001518
(OCoLC)36225424
Named Person: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark; William Clark; Meriwether Lewis
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Meriwether Lewis; William Clark; Bernard De Voto
ISBN: 0585109435 9780585109435
OCLC Number: 43476160
Notes: Based on the Reuben Gold Thwaites ed., published in 1904-1905.
"A Mariner book."
Description: 1 online resource (lx, 504 pages) : maps
Contents: Introduction / Anthony Brandt --
Jefferson's Instructions to Lewis --
From August 30 to September 18, 1803 --
Summary: September 19, 1803-May 13, 1804 --
From May 14 to June 14, 1804 --
Summary: June 15-July 26, 1804 --
From July 27 to August 26, 1804 --
Summary: August 27-September 22, 1804 --
From September 23 to November 6, 1804 --
Summary: November 7, 1804-April 6, 1805 --
From April 7 to May 9, 1805 --
Summary: May 10-June 12, 1805 --
From June 13 to July 2, 1805 --
Summary: July 3-July 31, 1805 --
From August 1 to August 17, 1805 --
Summary: August 18-September 3, 1805 --
From September 4 to September 25, 1805 --
Summary: September 26-October 20, 1805 --
From October 21 to November 7, 1805 --
Summary: November 8, 1805-April 12, 1806 --
From April 13 to April 23, 1806 --
Summary: April 24-June 25, 1806 --
From June 26 to July 1, 1806 --
Summary: Clark on the Yellowstone --
Lewis on the Marias --
Summary: Revisiting the Plains Indians --
From September 6 to September 26, 1806.
Other Titles: Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
Responsibility: edited by Bernard DeVoto ; foreword by Stephen E. Ambrose ; maps by Erwin Raisz.

Abstract:

"In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank - not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier." "He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/43476160>
library:oclcnum"43476160"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1997"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1997"
schema:exampleOfWork
<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/538138>
schema:name"Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition."
schema:genre"Electronic books"@en
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The journals of Lewis and Clark"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/43476160>
schema:reviewBody""In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank - not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier." "He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history."--Jacket."
schema:url<http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=10173>
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.