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Juan Bobo : four folktales from Puerto Rico

Author: Carmen T Bernier-Grand; Ernesto Ramos Nieves
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, ©1994.
Series: I can read book.
Edition/Format:   Book : Juvenile audience : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"An early reader with simple sentences and widely spaced lines retelling four noodlehead stories from the oral traition. Juan Bobo is not a naughty child, but he is not very smart, or at least he does not use his head, and nothing he does turns out as he intends. When he goes to fetch water and, finding the buckets too heavy, substitutes baskets, he is surprised to find a puddle at the door. Left to care for the pig  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Legends
Material Type: Juvenile audience
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Carmen T Bernier-Grand; Ernesto Ramos Nieves
ISBN: 0060233893 9780060233891 0060233907 9780060233907
OCLC Number: 28378019
Notes: Includes Spanish text at end.
Target Audience: Elementary Grade.; 360
Description: 58 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm.
Contents: The best way to carry water --
A pig in Sunday clothes --
Do not sneeze, do not scratch, do not eat --
A dime a jug.
Series Title: I can read book.
Responsibility: retold by Carmen T. Bernier-Grand ; pictures by Ernesto Ramos Nieves.

Abstract:

"An early reader with simple sentences and widely spaced lines retelling four noodlehead stories from the oral traition. Juan Bobo is not a naughty child, but he is not very smart, or at least he does not use his head, and nothing he does turns out as he intends. When he goes to fetch water and, finding the buckets too heavy, substitutes baskets, he is surprised to find a puddle at the door. Left to care for the pig while his mother goes to church, he manages to lose the pig and ruin his mother's clothes. After promising to be on his best behavior when they go on a visit, he gets his mother's signals mixed up, refuses all the good food, and comes home hungry. Trusted to sell his mother's sugar-cane syrup to the widows, whom his mother says he will know by their shiny black dresses, he mistakes flied from the mill for the widows, drinks the syrup himself, and comes home with money he has found. The humor is obvious enough the the youngest listener, and the bright illustrations showing a little brown-skinned boy in settings of rural Puerto Rico should make this a favorite of beginning readers. A Spanish translation is given at the end of the book."--Many Peoples - One land.

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