skip to content
Judgment without trial : Japanese American imprisonment during World War II Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Judgment without trial : Japanese American imprisonment during World War II

Author: Tetsuden Kashima
Publisher: Seattle : University of Washington Press, ©2003.
Series: Scott and Laurie Oki series in Asian American studies.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Publisher's description: Judgment without Trial reveals that long before the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government began making plans for the eventual internment and later incarceration of the Japanese American population. Tetsuden Kashima uses newly obtained records to trace this process back to the 1920s, when a nascent imprisonment organization was developed to prepare for a possible war with Japan,  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Tetsuden Kashima
ISBN: 0295982993 9780295982991
OCLC Number: 51653190
Description: xi, 316 p. : 2 ill., 1 map ; 24 cm.
Contents: The imprisonment process --
Pre-World War II preparations --
The internment process of the Justice and War Departments --
The territory of Hawaii --
The territory of Alaska and Latin America --
Justice Department and army camps --
The arbitrary process of control --
Segregation centers and other camps --
Abuses, protests, and the Geneva Convention --
Imprisonment and stigma.
Series Title: Scott and Laurie Oki series in Asian American studies.
Responsibility: Tetsuden Kashima.
More information:

Abstract:

Publisher's description: Judgment without Trial reveals that long before the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government began making plans for the eventual internment and later incarceration of the Japanese American population. Tetsuden Kashima uses newly obtained records to trace this process back to the 1920s, when a nascent imprisonment organization was developed to prepare for a possible war with Japan, and follows it in detail through the war years. Along with coverage of the well-known incarceration camps, the author discusses the less familiar and very different experiences of people of Japanese descent in the Justice and War Departments' internment camps that held internees from the continental U.S. and from Alaska, Hawaii, and Latin America. Utilizing extracts from diaries, contemporary sources, official communications, and interviews, Kashima brings an array of personalities to life on the pages of his book-those whose unbiased assessments of America's Japanese ancestry population were discounted or ignored, those whose works and actions were based on misinformed fears and racial animosities, those who tried to remedy the inequities of the system, and, by no means least, the prisoners themselves. Kashima's interest in this episode began with his own unanswered questions about his father's wartime experiences. From this very personal motivation, he has produced a panoramic and detailed picture-without rhetoric and emotionalism and supported at every step by documented fact-of a government that failed to protect a group of people for whom it had forcibly assumed total responsibility.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(3)

User lists with this item (7)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/51653190>
library:oclcnum"51653190"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/51653190>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1801850>
rdf:typej.2:Meeting
rdf:typeschema:Event
schema:name"Evacuation and relocation of Japanese Americans (United States : 1942-1945)"
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1180924>
rdf:typej.2:Meeting
rdf:typeschema:Event
schema:name"Evacuation and relocation of Japanese Americans (United States : 1942-1945)"
schema:name"World War (1939-1945)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85069606>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945."@en
schema:copyrightYear"2003"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2003"
schema:description"Publisher's description: Judgment without Trial reveals that long before the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government began making plans for the eventual internment and later incarceration of the Japanese American population. Tetsuden Kashima uses newly obtained records to trace this process back to the 1920s, when a nascent imprisonment organization was developed to prepare for a possible war with Japan, and follows it in detail through the war years. Along with coverage of the well-known incarceration camps, the author discusses the less familiar and very different experiences of people of Japanese descent in the Justice and War Departments' internment camps that held internees from the continental U.S. and from Alaska, Hawaii, and Latin America. Utilizing extracts from diaries, contemporary sources, official communications, and interviews, Kashima brings an array of personalities to life on the pages of his book-those whose unbiased assessments of America's Japanese ancestry population were discounted or ignored, those whose works and actions were based on misinformed fears and racial animosities, those who tried to remedy the inequities of the system, and, by no means least, the prisoners themselves. Kashima's interest in this episode began with his own unanswered questions about his father's wartime experiences. From this very personal motivation, he has produced a panoramic and detailed picture-without rhetoric and emotionalism and supported at every step by documented fact-of a government that failed to protect a group of people for whom it had forcibly assumed total responsibility."@en
schema:description"The imprisonment process -- Pre-World War II preparations -- The internment process of the Justice and War Departments -- The territory of Hawaii -- The territory of Alaska and Latin America -- Justice Department and army camps -- The arbitrary process of control -- Segregation centers and other camps -- Abuses, protests, and the Geneva Convention -- Imprisonment and stigma."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/905521087>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Judgment without trial : Japanese American imprisonment during World War II"@en
schema:numberOfPages"316"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.