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Juvenal and Persius

Author: Juvenal.; Persius.; George Gilbert Ramsay
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard Univ. Press ; London : W. Heinemann, 1979.
Series: Loeb classical library, 91.
Edition/Format:   Book : Latin : Rev. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
JUVENAL, Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis (c. A.D. 600-100); master of satirical hexameter poetry, was born in Aquinum, a rich freedman's son(?) who became a declaimer until middle age, and then between A.D. 100 and 140 used his powers in the composition first of scathing satires on Roman life, attacking the dead rather than the living, with special reference to ineptitude in poetry (Satire I); vices of fake philosophers
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Genre/Form: Poetry
Translations
Translations into English
Named Person: Juvenal; Persius; Juvenal.; Persius.
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Juvenal.; Persius.; George Gilbert Ramsay
ISBN: 0674991028 9780674991026 0434990914 9780434990917
OCLC Number: 5701198
Language Note: Latin and English on opposite pages.
Notes: First printed 1918.
Description: lxxxii, 415 pages ; 17 cm.
Contents: Preface. Introduction. Life of Juvenal. Life of Persius. Supposed obscurity of Persius. Persius and Juvenal compared. Satura of Rome. Lucilian satire. Juvenal's satires summarised. Mss of Juvenal. Mss of Persius. Mss of Juvenal as given in Housman's ediction, 1905. Mss of Persius as given in Buecheler's fourth edition revised by F Leo, 1910. Satires of Juvenal. Satires I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI Satires of Persius. Prologue Satires I II III IV V VI Index to Juvenal Index to Persius.
Series Title: Loeb classical library, 91.
Other Titles: Satirae
Responsibility: with an English translation by G.G. Ramsay.

Abstract:

JUVENAL, Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis (c. A.D. 600-100); master of satirical hexameter poetry, was born in Aquinum, a rich freedman's son(?) who became a declaimer until middle age, and then between A.D. 100 and 140 used his powers in the composition first of scathing satires on Roman life, attacking the dead rather than the living, with special reference to ineptitude in poetry (Satire I); vices of fake philosophers (2); grievances of the worthy poor (3); and of clients (5); a council-meeting under Emperor Dominian (4); vicious women (6); prospects of letters and learning under a new emperor (7); virtue not birth as giving nobility (8); and the vice of homosexuals (9); we have the true object of prayer (10);, paraphrased by Johnson in 'The Vanity of Human Wishes'; spend-thrift and frugal eating (11); a friend's escape from shipwreck; and will-hunters(12); guilty conscience and desire for revenge (13); parents as examples (14); cannibalism in Egypt (15); privileges of soldiers (16, unfinished).

PERSIUS, Aulus, Persius Flaccus (A.D. 34-62) of Volaterrae was of equestrian rank; he came to Rome and was trained in 'grammar', rhetoric, and Stoic philosophy. In company with his mother, sister and aunt and enjoying the friendship of Lucan and other famous people, he lived a sober life. He left six Satires only (in hexameters); after a prologue (in scazon metre) we have a Satire on the corruption of literature and morals (1); foolish methods of prayer (2); deliberately wrong living and lack of philosophy (3); the well-born insincere politician, and some of our own weaknesses (4); praise of Cornutus the Stoic; servility of men (5); and a chatty poem addressed to the poet Bassus (6).

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