skip to content
Kant on freedom, law, and happiness Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Kant on freedom, law, and happiness

Author: Paul Guyer
Publisher: Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The twelve essays in this collection argue for a radically different account of Kant's ethics. They explore an interpretation of his moral philosophy according to which freedom is the fundamental end of human action, but an end that can only be preserved and promoted by adherence to moral law. Moreover, Paul Guyer shows that while Kant did not view moral laws as simply prudential rules for the maximization of human  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Immanuel Kant; Immanuel Kant; Immanuel Kant; Immanuel Kant
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Paul Guyer
ISBN: 0521652782 9780521652780 0521654211 9780521654210
OCLC Number: 41368213
Description: xii, 440 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Mendelssohn and Kant: one source of the critical philosophy --
The unity of reason: pure reason as practical reason in Kant's early conception of the transcendental dialectic --
Freedom as the inner value of the world --
Kant's morality of law and morality of freedom --
The possibility of the categorical imperative --
The strategy of Kant's Groundwork --
Kantian foundations for liberalism --
Life, liberty, and property: Rawls and Kant --
Moral worth, virtue, and merit --
From a practical point of view: Kant's conception of a postulate of pure practical reason --
Nature, freedom, and happiness: the third proposition of Kant's Idea for a universal history --
Nature, morality, and the possibility of peace.
Responsibility: Paul Guyer.
More information:

Abstract:

"The twelve essays in this collection argue for a radically different account of Kant's ethics. They explore an interpretation of his moral philosophy according to which freedom is the fundamental end of human action, but an end that can only be preserved and promoted by adherence to moral law. Moreover, Paul Guyer shows that while Kant did not view moral laws as simply prudential rules for the maximization of human happiness, he did hold that an interpersonal system of happiness should result from the free choices of individual human beings if made with due respect for the freedom of all other humans to choose their own ends and ways of life as well."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(9)

User lists with this item (4)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/41368213>
library:oclcnum"41368213"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/41368213>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/82088490>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"(1724"
schema:birthDate"1724"
schema:deathDate"1804)"
schema:deathDate"1804"
schema:familyName"Kant"
schema:givenName"Immanuel"
schema:name"Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804"
schema:name"Kant, Immanuel, (1724-1804)"
schema:name"Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2000"
schema:description"Mendelssohn and Kant: one source of the critical philosophy -- The unity of reason: pure reason as practical reason in Kant's early conception of the transcendental dialectic -- Freedom as the inner value of the world -- Kant's morality of law and morality of freedom -- The possibility of the categorical imperative -- The strategy of Kant's Groundwork -- Kantian foundations for liberalism -- Life, liberty, and property: Rawls and Kant -- Moral worth, virtue, and merit -- From a practical point of view: Kant's conception of a postulate of pure practical reason -- Nature, freedom, and happiness: the third proposition of Kant's Idea for a universal history -- Nature, morality, and the possibility of peace."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/26914303>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Kant on freedom, law, and happiness"@en
schema:numberOfPages"440"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/41368213>
schema:reviewBody""The twelve essays in this collection argue for a radically different account of Kant's ethics. They explore an interpretation of his moral philosophy according to which freedom is the fundamental end of human action, but an end that can only be preserved and promoted by adherence to moral law. Moreover, Paul Guyer shows that while Kant did not view moral laws as simply prudential rules for the maximization of human happiness, he did hold that an interpersonal system of happiness should result from the free choices of individual human beings if made with due respect for the freedom of all other humans to choose their own ends and ways of life as well."--BOOK JACKET."
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.