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Killer flu

Author: Liev Schrieber
Publisher: [Raleigh, N.C.] : NC LIVE, 2004.
Series: American experience (Television program)
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Over the centuries, humans have endured many influenza pandemics. Descriptions of the disease in Europe date back to 1100 A.D., and sporadic, isolated outbreaks have likely been occurring for many thousands of years. But no flu ever struck as fast, as hard, and with such lethal power as the 1918, or "Spanish Flu," which rivals the Black Death as the deadliest epidemic in history. To a world already ravaged by war,  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Film, Internet resource
Document Type: Visual material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Liev Schrieber
OCLC Number: 227211077
Notes: Closed-captioned.
Title from HTML header (viewed on May 2, 2008).
Performer(s): Narrator: Liev Schrieber.
Description: 1 streaming video file (57 min.) : digital, MP4 file, sd., col.
Details: Mode of access: Internet.
Series Title: American experience (Television program)
Other Titles: nclive.org media collection
NC LIVE media collection
Secrets of the dead (Television program)

Abstract:

"Over the centuries, humans have endured many influenza pandemics. Descriptions of the disease in Europe date back to 1100 A.D., and sporadic, isolated outbreaks have likely been occurring for many thousands of years. But no flu ever struck as fast, as hard, and with such lethal power as the 1918, or "Spanish Flu," which rivals the Black Death as the deadliest epidemic in history. To a world already ravaged by war, the 1918 pandemic was crippling; some 30 to 40 million people died worldwide, with the highest death rate occur[r]ing in young men and women. In the United States, 675,000 people died, including over 40,000 G.I.s -- 40 percent of all of those who perished in World War I. Since the original broadcast SECRET'S OF THE DEAD: KILLER FLUE, Taubenberger's team has successfully created a genetic sequencing of the 1918 virus, resurrected the virus itself to study its effects on lung tissue, and this fall announced a striking similarity between the 1918 virus and today's H5N1 avian flu virus. Their findings indicate that the 1918 virus originated as a bird flu, confirming the legitimacy of concerns about avian flu"--FAQ page.

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Linked Data


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