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King : the social archaeology of a late Mississippian town in northwestern Georgia

Author: David J Hally
Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Print book : CD for computer : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"At the time of Spanish contact in A.D. 1540, the Mississippian inhabitants of the great valley in northwestern Georgia and adjacent portions of Alabama and Tennessee were organized into a number of chiefdoms distributed along the Coosa and Tennessee rivers and their major tributaries. The administrative centers of these polities were large settlements with one or more platform mounds and plazas. Each had a large  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David J Hally
ISBN: 9780817316044 0817316043 9780817354602 0817354603 9780817381219 081738121X
OCLC Number: 185056544
Description: xxv, 589 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
Contents: The nature of Mississippian society --
The natural, cultural, and historical context of the King Site --
Site excavations --
Domestic architecture --
Public architecture --
Burial descriptions --
Household and community --
Analysis of burial attribute associations --
Artifact co-occurrences --
Artifact co-occurrences among adult males --
Community and polity in northwestern Georgia --
Contents of accompanying compact disc: Appendix A: Description of primary domestic structures; Appendix B: Description of rectangular structures; Appendix C: Burial data; Appendix D: Stratigraphic characteristics of disturbed, intrusive, and multiple burials; Appendix E: Age and sex identification of burials; Appendix F: Burial assignment of grave goods in multiple and intrusive burials; Appendix G: Location of burials; Appendix H: Location of postholes and features.
Responsibility: David J. Hally.
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Abstract:

At the time of Spanish contact in AD 1540, the Mississippian inhabitants in north-western Georgia and adjacent portions of Alabama and Tennessee were organized into a number of chiefdoms distributed  Read more...

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"The King Site has been a part of the archaeological literature for years. Now David Hally has produced the definitive volume on this remarkable excavation. His explanation of households, site Read more...

 
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schema:description"The nature of Mississippian society -- The natural, cultural, and historical context of the King Site -- Site excavations -- Domestic architecture -- Public architecture -- Burial descriptions -- Household and community -- Analysis of burial attribute associations -- Artifact co-occurrences -- Artifact co-occurrences among adult males -- Community and polity in northwestern Georgia -- Contents of accompanying compact disc: Appendix A: Description of primary domestic structures; Appendix B: Description of rectangular structures; Appendix C: Burial data; Appendix D: Stratigraphic characteristics of disturbed, intrusive, and multiple burials; Appendix E: Age and sex identification of burials; Appendix F: Burial assignment of grave goods in multiple and intrusive burials; Appendix G: Location of burials; Appendix H: Location of postholes and features."@en
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schema:reviewBody""At the time of Spanish contact in A.D. 1540, the Mississippian inhabitants of the great valley in northwestern Georgia and adjacent portions of Alabama and Tennessee were organized into a number of chiefdoms distributed along the Coosa and Tennessee rivers and their major tributaries. The administrative centers of these polities were large settlements with one or more platform mounds and plazas. Each had a large resident population, but most polity members lived in a half dozen or so towns located within a day's walk of the center. This book is about one such town, located on the Coosa River in Georgia and known to archaeologists as the King site." "The King site represents a nearly ideal opportunity to identify the kinds of status positions that were held by individual inhabitants; analyze individual households and investigate the roles they played in King site society; reconstruct the community that existed at King, including size, life history, symbolic associations, and integrative mechanisms; and place King in the larger regional political system. With excavations dating back to 1973, and supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Geographic Society, this is social archaeology at its best."--Jacket."
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