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Kingdom to commune : Protestant pacifist culture between World War I and the Vietnam era

Author: Patricia Faith Appelbaum
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
American religious pacifism is usually explained in terms of its practitioners' ethical and philosophical commitments. Patricia Appelbaum argues that Protestant pacifism, which constituted the religious center of the large-scale peace movement in the United States after World War I, is best understood as a culture that developed dynamically in the broader context of American religious, historical, and social  Read more...
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Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Patricia Faith Appelbaum
ISBN: 9780807832677 0807832677 9780807859384 0807859389
OCLC Number: 245536193
Description: x, 330 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: I"Character, 'bad'" : Harold Gray --
From YMCA to CPS : pacifist social networks --
The Protestant heart : pacifist theology --
The pacifist vernacular --
Performing pacifism : worship, plays, and pageants --
Swords and plowshares : pacifist iconography --
"The practice of the presence" : pacifist spirituality --
Training for peace : Richard Gregg and the realignment of pacifist life --
Milking goats for peace : a new paradigm --
"Victories without violence" : pacifist stories --
"Bad mother" : Marjorie Swann.
Responsibility: Patricia Appelbaum.
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Abstract:

American religious pacifism is usually explained in terms of its practitioners' ethical and philosophical commitments. This book argues that Protestant pacifism, which constituted the religious  Read more...

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"This well-researched and timely book makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of twentieth-century pacifism. . . . Appelbaum illustrates the development of pacifist culture with a range of Read more...

 
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schema:description"I"Character, 'bad'" : Harold Gray -- From YMCA to CPS : pacifist social networks -- The Protestant heart : pacifist theology -- The pacifist vernacular -- Performing pacifism : worship, plays, and pageants -- Swords and plowshares : pacifist iconography -- "The practice of the presence" : pacifist spirituality -- Training for peace : Richard Gregg and the realignment of pacifist life -- Milking goats for peace : a new paradigm -- "Victories without violence" : pacifist stories -- "Bad mother" : Marjorie Swann."@en
schema:description"American religious pacifism is usually explained in terms of its practitioners' ethical and philosophical commitments. Patricia Appelbaum argues that Protestant pacifism, which constituted the religious center of the large-scale peace movement in the United States after World War I, is best understood as a culture that developed dynamically in the broader context of American religious, historical, and social currents. Exploring piety, practice, and material religion, Appelbaum describes a surprisingly complex culture of Protestant pacifism expressed through social networks, iconography, vernacular theology, individual spiritual practice, storytelling, identity rituals, and cooperative living. Between World War I and the Vietnam War, she contends, a paradigm shift took place in the Protestant pacifist movement. Pacifism moved from a mainstream position to a sectarian and marginal one, from an embrace of modernity to skepticism about it, and from a Christian center to a purely pacifist one, with an informal, flexible theology. The book begins and ends with biographical profiles of two very different pacifists, Harold Gray and Marjorie Swann. Their stories distill the changing religious culture of American pacifism revealed in Kingdom to Commune."@en
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