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Kokoschka

Author: Oskar Kokoschka; José María Faerna
Publisher: New York : Cameo/Abrams [i.e. Abrams/Cameo], 1995.
Series: Great modern masters.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A major figure in the Expressionist movement, Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980) studied in Vienna, and early in his career was strongly influenced by Art Nouveau, particularly the elegant style of Gustav Klimt. Around 1909 he painted the first of his Expressionist portraits, which seem to reveal their sitters' emotional life. The restless draftsmanship and broken patterns of color in these likenesses predict the emergence
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Genre/Form: Catalogs
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Kokoschka, Oskar, 1886-1980.
Kokoschka.
New York : Cameo/Abrams [i.e. Abrams/Cameo], 1995
(OCoLC)604719184
Named Person: Oskar Kokoschka; Oskar Kokoschka; Oskar Kokoschka; Oskar Kokoschka
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Oskar Kokoschka; José María Faerna
ISBN: 0810946823 9780810946828
OCLC Number: 33359715
Description: 64 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 32 cm.
Contents: Children playing, 1909 --
Martha Hirsch, 1909 --
Felix Albrecht Harta, 1909 --
Adolf Loos, 1909 --
Hans Tietze and Erica Tietze-Conrat, 1909 --
Peter Altenberg, 1909 --
Joseph de Montesquiou-Fezensac, 1910 --
Herwarth Walden, 1910 --
Count Verona, 1910 --
Les Dents du Midi, 1910 --
Alpine landscape, Murren, 1910 --
Double portrait, 1912-13 --
Alma Mahler, 1912 --
Bride of the wind, 1914 --
Still life with cupid and rabbit, 1913-14 --
Friends, 1917-18 --
Power of music, 1920 --
Self-portrait with doll, 1922 --
Woman in blue, 1919 --
Dresden, Neustadt II, 1921 --
Young girl with doll, 1921-22 --
Dresden, Augustus bridge with steamboat II, 1923 --
Dresden, bridges of the Elbe, 1923 --
Self-portrait with arms crossed, 1923 --
London, Waterloo bridge, 1926 --
Nancy Cunard, 1924 --
Adele Astaire, 1926 --
Karl Krauss II, 1925 --
London, panorama of the Thames I, 1926 --
Tigon, 1926 --
Marczell von Nemes, 1929 --
Lyon, 1927 --
Jerusalem, 1929 --
Leo Kestenberg, 1926-27 --
Arab of Temacina, 1928 --
Arab women and children, 1929 --
Vienna, view from the Wilhelminenberg, 1931 --
Pan, Trudl with goat, 1931 --
Thomas G. Masaryk, 1936 --
Nymph, 1936 --
Olda Palkovska, 1937 --
Prague, view from the wharf on the Moldau toward Kleinseite and the Hradcany IV, 1936 --
Prague, nostalgia, 1938 --
Self portrait of a degenerate artist, 1937 --
Red egg, 1940-41 --
Michael Croft, 1938-39 --
Sea spider, 1939-40 --
Summer II, 1939-40 --
Anschluss, Alice in Wonderland, 1942 --
That for which we fight, 1943 --
Marianne-Maquis, 1942 --
Cathleen, Countess of Drogheda, 1946 --
London, Chelsea reach, 1957 --
Theodor Korner, 1949 --
Louis Krohnberg, 1950 --
Pablo Casals, 1954 --
London, view of the Thames from Shell-Mex House, 1959 --
New York, Manhattan with the Empire State Building, 1966 --
Self-portrait with Olda, 1966 --
Lake Leman with steamboat, 1957 --
Saul and David, 1966 --
Herodotus, 1960-64 --
Myth of Prometheus, 1950 --
Morning and afternoon, 1966 --
Peer Gynt, 1973 --
Theseus and Antiope, 1958-75 --
Time, gentlemen, please, 1971-72 --
Self-portrait, 1969.
Series Title: Great modern masters.
Other Titles: Kokoschka.
Responsibility: general editor, José María Faerna ; translated from the Spanish by Diana Cobos.

Abstract:

A major figure in the Expressionist movement, Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980) studied in Vienna, and early in his career was strongly influenced by Art Nouveau, particularly the elegant style of Gustav Klimt. Around 1909 he painted the first of his Expressionist portraits, which seem to reveal their sitters' emotional life. The restless draftsmanship and broken patterns of color in these likenesses predict the emergence of the artist's mature style in such paintings as Bride.

of the Wind of 1914. Seriously wounded in World War I, Kokoschka produced little work until 1924, when he began a series of journeys through Europe and North Africa that refreshed his creative spirit. During this period he embarked on a number of color experiments, particularly in landscape paintings, in which he combined a traditional organization of the painting's space seen from a high viewpoint with brilliant colors, set forth with his characteristic energetic.

brushwork. These visionary landscapes communicate a passionate vision, seeming at times exhilarated, at times anguished. In the 1930s, the artist's work was condemned by the Nazi regime as "degenerate" and his paintings in public collections were confiscated. In 1938 he moved to London, and after World War II, to Switzerland, where he spent most of the rest of his life. Kokoschka's late paintings retain the Expressionist qualities of his best mature work, and though he.

never fully deserted representation, their increasing abstraction reveals a kinship to Abstract Expressionism.

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Linked Data


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schema:description"of the Wind of 1914. Seriously wounded in World War I, Kokoschka produced little work until 1924, when he began a series of journeys through Europe and North Africa that refreshed his creative spirit. During this period he embarked on a number of color experiments, particularly in landscape paintings, in which he combined a traditional organization of the painting's space seen from a high viewpoint with brilliant colors, set forth with his characteristic energetic."@en
schema:description"Children playing, 1909 -- Martha Hirsch, 1909 -- Felix Albrecht Harta, 1909 -- Adolf Loos, 1909 -- Hans Tietze and Erica Tietze-Conrat, 1909 -- Peter Altenberg, 1909 -- Joseph de Montesquiou-Fezensac, 1910 -- Herwarth Walden, 1910 -- Count Verona, 1910 -- Les Dents du Midi, 1910 -- Alpine landscape, Murren, 1910 -- Double portrait, 1912-13 -- Alma Mahler, 1912 -- Bride of the wind, 1914 -- Still life with cupid and rabbit, 1913-14 -- Friends, 1917-18 -- Power of music, 1920 -- Self-portrait with doll, 1922 -- Woman in blue, 1919 -- Dresden, Neustadt II, 1921 -- Young girl with doll, 1921-22 -- Dresden, Augustus bridge with steamboat II, 1923 -- Dresden, bridges of the Elbe, 1923 -- Self-portrait with arms crossed, 1923 -- London, Waterloo bridge, 1926 -- Nancy Cunard, 1924 -- Adele Astaire, 1926 -- Karl Krauss II, 1925 -- London, panorama of the Thames I, 1926 -- Tigon, 1926 -- Marczell von Nemes, 1929 -- Lyon, 1927 -- Jerusalem, 1929 -- Leo Kestenberg, 1926-27 -- Arab of Temacina, 1928 -- Arab women and children, 1929 -- Vienna, view from the Wilhelminenberg, 1931 -- Pan, Trudl with goat, 1931 -- Thomas G. Masaryk, 1936 -- Nymph, 1936 -- Olda Palkovska, 1937 -- Prague, view from the wharf on the Moldau toward Kleinseite and the Hradcany IV, 1936 -- Prague, nostalgia, 1938 -- Self portrait of a degenerate artist, 1937 -- Red egg, 1940-41 -- Michael Croft, 1938-39 -- Sea spider, 1939-40 -- Summer II, 1939-40 -- Anschluss, Alice in Wonderland, 1942 -- That for which we fight, 1943 -- Marianne-Maquis, 1942 -- Cathleen, Countess of Drogheda, 1946 -- London, Chelsea reach, 1957 -- Theodor Korner, 1949 -- Louis Krohnberg, 1950 -- Pablo Casals, 1954 -- London, view of the Thames from Shell-Mex House, 1959 -- New York, Manhattan with the Empire State Building, 1966 -- Self-portrait with Olda, 1966 -- Lake Leman with steamboat, 1957 -- Saul and David, 1966 -- Herodotus, 1960-64 -- Myth of Prometheus, 1950 -- Morning and afternoon, 1966 -- Peer Gynt, 1973 -- Theseus and Antiope, 1958-75 -- Time, gentlemen, please, 1971-72 -- Self-portrait, 1969."@en
schema:description"A major figure in the Expressionist movement, Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980) studied in Vienna, and early in his career was strongly influenced by Art Nouveau, particularly the elegant style of Gustav Klimt. Around 1909 he painted the first of his Expressionist portraits, which seem to reveal their sitters' emotional life. The restless draftsmanship and broken patterns of color in these likenesses predict the emergence of the artist's mature style in such paintings as Bride."@en
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