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Lambda: The Ultimate Imperative.

Author: Guy Lewis Jr Steele; Gerald Jay Sussman; MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center MAR 1976.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This report demonstrates how to model the following common programming constructs in terms of an applicative order language similar to LISP: Simple Recursion; Iteratiion; Compound Statements and Expressions; GO TO and Assignment; Continuation-Passing; Escape Expressions; Fluid Variables; and Call by Name, Call by Need, and Call by reference. The models require only (possibly self-referent) lambda application,  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Guy Lewis Jr Steele; Gerald Jay Sussman; MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB.
OCLC Number: 227432664
Description: 43 p.

Abstract:

This report demonstrates how to model the following common programming constructs in terms of an applicative order language similar to LISP: Simple Recursion; Iteratiion; Compound Statements and Expressions; GO TO and Assignment; Continuation-Passing; Escape Expressions; Fluid Variables; and Call by Name, Call by Need, and Call by reference. The models require only (possibly self-referent) lambda application, conditionals, and (rarely) assignment. No complex data structures such as stacks are used. The models are transparent, involving only local syntactic transformations. Some of these models, such as those for GO TO and assignment, are already well known, and appear in the work of Landin, Reynolds, and others. The models for escape expressions, fluid variables, and call by need with the side effects are new. This paper is partly tutorial in intent, gathering all the models together for purposes of context. (Author).

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