skip to content
Land without evil : utopian journeys across the South American watershed Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Land without evil : utopian journeys across the South American watershed

Author: Richard Gott
Publisher: London ; New York : Verso, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
All too often, travel writers plunge into seemingly obscure parts of the globe with little knowledge of where they are, whom they are among, or what has happened there in the past. In this trend-breaking anti-travel book, Richard Gott describes his own journey through the heart of South America, across the swampland that forms the watershed between the River Plate and the River Amazon. But the story of his  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Gott, Richard, 1938-
Land without evil.
London ; New York : Verso, 1993
(OCoLC)643976189
Named Person: Richard Gott; Richard Gott
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Gott
ISBN: 0860913988 9780860913986
OCLC Number: 26504542
Description: xv, 320 : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: Pt. I. Across the Pantanal. 1. Campo Grande. 2. Terenos. 3. Aquidauana. 4. Miranda. 5. Guaycurus. 6. Taunay --
Pt. II. The Upper Paraguay. 7. Porto Esperanza. 8. Albuquerque. 9. Corumba. 10. Puerto Suarez --
Pt. III. The Missions of Chiquitos. 11. Santo Corazon. 12. Santiago Apostol. 13. San Jose de Chiquitos. 14. San Rafael. 15. San Miguel. 16. San Ignacio de Velasco. 17. San Javier --
Pt. IV. The Missions of Mojos. 18. Santa Cruz de la Sierra. 19. Trinidad. 20. Magdalena. 21. San Pedro de Mojos. 22. Return to Trinidad. 23. Exaltacion.
Responsibility: Richard Gott.
More information:

Abstract:

All too often, travel writers plunge into seemingly obscure parts of the globe with little knowledge of where they are, whom they are among, or what has happened there in the past. In this trend-breaking anti-travel book, Richard Gott describes his own journey through the heart of South America, across the swampland that forms the watershed between the River Plate and the River Amazon. But the story of his expedition takes second place to a brilliant resurrection of the historical events in the area over five hundred years, of the people who have lived there and the visitors who have made the same journey. The land crossed by the Upper Paraguay river once formed the contested frontier in South America between Spanish and Portuguese territory. The Portuguese sent expeditions through it in attempts to reach the Spanish silver mines of the Andes, and the Jesuits (supported by the monarch in Madrid) established strategic hamlets - the famous Indian missions - to stabilize the frontier. But this was not the beginning or end of conflict in the area. Earlier, the Guarani-speaking Indian nations of Paraguay had made violent contact across the swamp with the Quechua - speakers of the Inca empire; later, after the departure of the Spaniards, the nineteenth century witnessed a prolonged period of purposeful extermination of the local peoples. Since the Spanish conquest, the area has seen an endless procession of newcomers pursuing unsuitable and utopian programmes of economic and social development that have inevitably ended in disaster for the local population. Intermingling accounts of his own travels over many years with those of Jesuit priests, Spanish conquistadores and Portuguese Mamelukes, together with those of other visitors such as Alcides D'Orbigny, Theodore Roosevelt, and Claude Levi-Strauss, Richard Gott weaves a complex web of narrative that brings to life the almost unknown frontier land of Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. Both gripping and polemical, Land Without Evil is a significant contribution to our knowledge of South America.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/26504542>
library:oclcnum"26504542"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/26504542>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1993"
schema:description"Pt. I. Across the Pantanal. 1. Campo Grande. 2. Terenos. 3. Aquidauana. 4. Miranda. 5. Guaycurus. 6. Taunay -- Pt. II. The Upper Paraguay. 7. Porto Esperanza. 8. Albuquerque. 9. Corumba. 10. Puerto Suarez -- Pt. III. The Missions of Chiquitos. 11. Santo Corazon. 12. Santiago Apostol. 13. San Jose de Chiquitos. 14. San Rafael. 15. San Miguel. 16. San Ignacio de Velasco. 17. San Javier -- Pt. IV. The Missions of Mojos. 18. Santa Cruz de la Sierra. 19. Trinidad. 20. Magdalena. 21. San Pedro de Mojos. 22. Return to Trinidad. 23. Exaltacion."@en
schema:description"All too often, travel writers plunge into seemingly obscure parts of the globe with little knowledge of where they are, whom they are among, or what has happened there in the past. In this trend-breaking anti-travel book, Richard Gott describes his own journey through the heart of South America, across the swampland that forms the watershed between the River Plate and the River Amazon. But the story of his expedition takes second place to a brilliant resurrection of the historical events in the area over five hundred years, of the people who have lived there and the visitors who have made the same journey. The land crossed by the Upper Paraguay river once formed the contested frontier in South America between Spanish and Portuguese territory. The Portuguese sent expeditions through it in attempts to reach the Spanish silver mines of the Andes, and the Jesuits (supported by the monarch in Madrid) established strategic hamlets - the famous Indian missions - to stabilize the frontier. But this was not the beginning or end of conflict in the area. Earlier, the Guarani-speaking Indian nations of Paraguay had made violent contact across the swamp with the Quechua - speakers of the Inca empire; later, after the departure of the Spaniards, the nineteenth century witnessed a prolonged period of purposeful extermination of the local peoples. Since the Spanish conquest, the area has seen an endless procession of newcomers pursuing unsuitable and utopian programmes of economic and social development that have inevitably ended in disaster for the local population. Intermingling accounts of his own travels over many years with those of Jesuit priests, Spanish conquistadores and Portuguese Mamelukes, together with those of other visitors such as Alcides D'Orbigny, Theodore Roosevelt, and Claude Levi-Strauss, Richard Gott weaves a complex web of narrative that brings to life the almost unknown frontier land of Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. Both gripping and polemical, Land Without Evil is a significant contribution to our knowledge of South America."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/365824599>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Land without evil : utopian journeys across the South American watershed"@en
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.