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Language and the structure of Berkeley's world

Author: Kenneth L Pearce
Publisher: Oxford, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2017.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"According to George Berkeley (1685-1753), there is fundamentally nothing in the world but minds and their ideas. Ideas are understood as pure phenomenal 'feels' which are momentarily had by a single perceiver, then vanish. Surprisingly, Berkeley tries to sell this idealistic philosophical system as a defense of common sense and an aid to science. However, both common sense and Newtonian science take the perceived  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: George Berkeley; George Berkeley
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Kenneth L Pearce
ISBN: 0198790333 9780198790334
OCLC Number: 964379298
Description: xiv, 218 pages : illustration ; 24 cm
Contents: Machine generated contents note: Problem: Structure --
Solution: Language --
Aims and Methodology --
Summary of the Chapters --
1. Berkeley's Attack on Meanings --
Theory of Meanings --
Dialectical Structure of Berkeley's Attack --
Case against Abstraction --
phenomenological appeal --
impossibility of abstract ideas --
uselessness of abstract ideas --
Conclusion --
2. Berkeley's Early Thoughts on Language --
General Words --
Operative Language --
Mathematical and Scientific Language --
Arithmetic and algebra --
Geometry --
Physics --
Conclusion --
3. Berkeley's Theory of Language in Alciphron 7 --
Overview of the Dialogue --
General Theory of Language --
Meaning as Use --
Ideational and Operative Language --
Conclusion --
4. Rules and Rule-Following --
Implicit and Explicit Rule-Following --
Rules and Knowledge --
Conventional Rules of Language --
Inference Rules --
5. Reference and Quasi-Reference --
Labeling --
Generalizing --
Labeling and Existence --
Quasi-Referring --
Metaphysics of Quasi-Entities --
6. Quasi-Referring to Bodies --
Against Materialist Semantics --
Bodies as Linguistic Constructions --
Alternative Interpretations --
Subjunctive interpretations --
Idea interpretations --
Richness of Berkeleian Bodies --
Knowledge of Bodies --
Predication --
Existence, Reality, Identity --
7. Referring to Spirits and Their Actions --
Referring to Actions --
Referring to Spirits --
Existence, Reality, Identity --
Conclusion --
8. Assent and Truth --
Nature of Assent --
Assent without ideas --
Scientific knowledge: Berkeley's anti-skepticism --
Religious faith: Berkeley's replies to Toland and Browne --
Partial assent --
Nature of Truth --
Truth and usefulness --
Degrees of truth --
Holism --
Fit with reality --
Conclusion --
9. Linguistic Structure of Berkeley's World --
Literal Language of Nature --
Visual language --
Other sense modalities --
Lexicography: Co-Instantiation --
Syntax: Causation and Laws --
Excursus on Common Sense and Natural Science --
Semantics --
Informing and instructing about ideas --
Informing about other finite minds --
Informing about God --
interpretation of the discourse of nature.
Responsibility: Kenneth L. Pearce.

Abstract:

George Berkeley (1685-1753) was an Anglo-Irish bishop, considered among the great philosophers of early modern Europe. Pearce develops a new interpretation of Berkeley's philosophy which emphasizes  Read more...

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Pearce is a compelling writer, and this is a very rich book, full of both interesting textual analyses and interventions in particular scholarly debates, and with a strong story to tell about how to Read more...

 
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