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Latitudinal and insular variation of skull size in crab-eating macaques (primates, Cercopithecidae: Macaca fascicularis).
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Latitudinal and insular variation of skull size in crab-eating macaques (primates, Cercopithecidae: Macaca fascicularis).

Author: J Fooden Affiliation: Division of Mammals, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois 60605.; GH Albrecht
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:American journal of physical anthropology, 1993 Dec; 92(4): 521-38
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Summary:
Macaca fascicularis is broadly distributed in Southeast Asia across 30 degrees of latitude and 35 degrees of longitude (Indochinese Peninsula, Isthmus of Kra, Malay Peninsula, Greater and Lesser Sunda Islands, Philippine Islands, and numerous small, neighboring islands). The range is divisible into 1) a core area comprised of mainland Southeast Asia, Borneo, Sumatra, and Java (large land masses interconnected during  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: J Fooden Affiliation: Division of Mammals, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois 60605.; GH Albrecht
ISSN:0002-9483
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 116765849
Awards:

Abstract:

Macaca fascicularis is broadly distributed in Southeast Asia across 30 degrees of latitude and 35 degrees of longitude (Indochinese Peninsula, Isthmus of Kra, Malay Peninsula, Greater and Lesser Sunda Islands, Philippine Islands, and numerous small, neighboring islands). The range is divisible into 1) a core area comprised of mainland Southeast Asia, Borneo, Sumatra, and Java (large land masses interconnected during the last glacial maximum, 18,000 B.P.); 2) shallow-water fringing islands, which are smaller islands connected to the core area during the last glacial maximum; and 3) deep-water fringing islands, which are peripheral islands not connected to the core area during the last glacial maximum. Skull length was used to study effects of latitude and insularity on patterns of size variation. The data are from 802 adult M. fascicularis specimens from 140 core-area localities, 63 shallow-water islands, and 29 deep-water islands. Sex-specific polynomial regressions of skull length on latitude were used to describe skull length variation in the core area. These regressions served as standards for evaluating variation among samples from shallow-water and deep-water islands. The core area exhibits Bergmannian latitudinal size clines through most of the species range. Thus, skull length decreases from about 8 degrees S (Java) to the equator (Sumatra and Borneo), then increases as far north as about 13 degrees N (Isthmus of Kra). Farther north, to the northernmost Indochinese localities at about 17 degrees N, skull length in M. fascicularis decreases with increasing latitude, contrary to Bergmann's rule. Latitudinal size variation in shallow-water fringing islands generally parallels that in the core area. However, skull length tends to be smaller than in the core area at similar latitudes. Deep-water fringing islands are markedly more variable, with relatively small specimens in the Lesser Sunda Islands and relatively large specimens in the Nicobar Islands. These analyses illustrate how a primate species may vary in response to latitudinal temperature variation and to isolation.

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