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Learning through practice : models, traditions, orientations and approaches

Author: Stephen Billett
Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2010.
Series: Professional and practice-based learning, v. 1.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Practice-based learning{u2014}the kind of education that comes from experiencing real work in real situations{u2014}has always been a prerequisite to qualification in professions such as medicine. However, there is growing interest in how practice-based models of learning can assist the initial preparation for and further development of skills for a wider range of occupations. Rather than being seen as a tool of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Learning through practice.
Dordrecht ; London : Springer, 2010
(DLC) 2010926022
(OCoLC)502033939
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Stephen Billett
ISBN: 9789048139392 9048139392
OCLC Number: 642718677
Description: 1 online resource (xx, 288 pages).
Contents: Series Foreword --
Series Editors{u2019} Foreword --
Contents --
Contributors --
1. Learning through Practice --
1.1 Learning through Practice --
1.2 Emerging and Growing Interest in Learning through Practice --
1.3 Approaches to and Models of Learning through Practice --
1.4 Section One: Conceptual Premises of Learning through Practice --
1.5 Section Two: Instances of Practice --
2. Learning in Praxis, Learning for Praxis --
2.1 Introduction --
2.2 Praxis and Theory --
2.2.1 A Historical Perspective --
2.2.2 A Phenomenological Perspective --
2.3 Learning at/for Work: A Case from Fish Culture --
2.4 Coda --
3. Knowledge, Working Practices, and Learning --
3.1 My Perspective on Knowledge --
3.2 Learning Trajectories --
3.3 The Construction of Professional Practices in the Workplace --
3.4 How do People Learn at Work? --
3.5 Transfer of Knowledge Between Contexts --
3.6 Factors Affecting Learning at Work --
3.7 The Role of the Manager in Supporting Learning --
4. The Practices of Learning through Occupations --
4.1 Learning for and through Practice --
4.2 Historical Conceptions of Learning through Practice and their Worth --
4.3 Participatory Practice: A Conception of Learning through Practice --
4.4 Individuals{u2019} Engagement, Agency, and Subjectivity --
Invitational Qualities --
4.5 Intersubjectivity, Appropriation, and Extending Knowledge --
4.6 Participation and Learning --
5. Objectual Practice and Learning in Professional Work --
5.1 Professional Work and Learning --
5.2 New Contexts for Professional Work --
5.3 Object-related Learning --
5.4 The Study --
5.5 Dynamics of Objectual Practice in Computer Engineering --
5.5.1 Interplay between Explorative and Confirmative Practice --
5.5.2 Linking Practitioners with Wider Knowledge Communities --
5.5.3 Mediating Participation along Multiple Timescales --
5.5.4 Facilitating Reflexive Learning --
5.6 Concluding Remarks --
6. Learning through and about Practice: A Lifeworld Perspective --
6.1 A Need to Reexamine Learning through Practice --
6.2 Historical Development of Lifeworld Perspective --
6.3 Ways of Being in Workplace Contexts --
6.4 Learning Ways of Being in Higher Education Contexts --
6.5 Learning from a Lifeworld Perspective: Developing Ways of Being --
7. Conceptualising Professional Identification as Flexibility, Stability and Ambivalence --
7.1. Learning and Professional Identification as Life Politics --
7.1.1 Flexibility {u2013} Stability {u2013} Ambivalence --
7.2 Empirical Data --
7.3 Becoming an Engineer or a Physician --
7.3.1 Becoming an Engineer --
7.3.2 Becoming a Physician --
7.4 Being an Engineer or a Physician --
7.4.1 Identification as a Flexible Strategy or a Permanent State --
7.4.2 Engineer {u2013} Confined to Workplace, Occupation, and Hours --
7.4.3 Physician {u2013} Profession Associated with Personality --
7.5 Flexibility, Stability, and Ambivalence in Practice --
7.6 Work, Life Politics, and Sustainable Life --
7.6.1 Lifelong Qualification as Exclusion --
7.6.2 Learning and Professional Identification as Life Politics --
7.7 Concluding Remarks --
8. Developing Vocational Practice and Social Capital in Jewellery --
8.1 Introduction --
8.2 Workplace and Practice-based Learning --
8.3 The Development of Work Placement Scheme in the Jewellery Industry --
8.4 The Development of Vocational Practice in the Jewellery Industry --
8.5 Practice-based Learning: Epistemic and Pedagogic Issues --
8.6 Conclusion --
9. Guidance as an Interactional Accomplishment Practice-based Learning within the Swiss VET System --
9.1 Introduction --
9.2 Apprenticeship in the Swiss VET System --
9.3 Researching Vocational Learning and Language-in-Interaction --
9.4 An Interactional Approach to Guidance in the Workplace --
9.4.1 Spontaneous Guidance --
9.4.2 Requested Guidance --
9.4.3 Distributed Guidance --
9.4.4 Denied Guidance --
9.5 Concluding Remarks and Practical Implications --
10. Cooperative Education: Integrating Classroom and Workplace Learning --
10.1 Cooperative Education as a Model of Practice-based Learning --
10.2 The Development of Cooperative Education --
10.3 The Organisational Milieu of Cooperative Education --
10.4 Theorising Learning in Cooperative Education --
10.5 Integrating Classroom and Workplace Learning --
10.6 The Real Value of Cooperative Education --
11. Individual Learning Paths of Employees in the Context of Social Networks --
11.1 Introduction --
11.2 Viewing the Organisation as a Network of Actors --
11.3 Learning-Relevant Experiences Gained from the Work Network --
11.3.1 How Actors Organise Work: A Cycle --
11.3.2 Four Ideal Types of Work Process --
11.3.3 Three Dimensions in Work-Network Structures --
11.4 Learning-Relevant Experiences Gained in the Learning Network --
11.4.1 Actors Organise Learning Networks: A Cycle --
11.4.2 Actors Create Learning Programmes --
11.4.3 Four Ideal Types of Learning Network --
11.4.4 The Importance of Actors{u2019} Action Theories --
11.5 How do Employees create their Individual Learning Paths? --
11.6 Learning, Networks, Structure, and Agency --
12. Apprenticeships: What happens in On-the-Job Training (OJT)? --
12.1 Apprenticeship and Learning --
12.1.1 Institutional History of Apprenticeship Programmes in the US --
12.2 Methodology of this Study --
12.3 The Physical Context of the Classroom as compared to the Field --
12.4 On the Job: The Worksite itself as Resource for Learning --
12.5 On the Job: Tools and Equipment as Resources for Learning --
12.6 Learning Through Interaction without Master-Apprentice Relationships --
12.7 Learning and the {u2018}Bottom Line{u2019} --
12.8 What can go Wrong --
12.9 Apprenticeship Learning as Reproduction of the Economic Viability --
12.10 Conclusion --
13. Interactive Research as a Strategy for Practice-based Learninge --
13.1 Introduction --
13.2 Towards a Model of Competence Development --
13.3 Cultural Context of Teachers{u2019} Learning and Professional Growth --
13.4 Interactive Research --
13.5 The Interactive Processes {u2013} The {u2018}Quality Case{u2019} --
13.5.1 Local Schools{u2019} Collective Competence Development --
13.6 The Practice-based Model --
13.6.1 Identifying Practice --
13.6.2 Reflective Transformation --
13.6.3 Joint Construction and Institutionalisation of Tools --
13.6.4 Professional Growth and Remaking of Practice --
14. The Relationship between Coach and Coachees --
14.1 Coaching --
14.1.1 The Coaching Relationship --
14.2 Coachees{u2019} Accounts of the Coaching Relationship --
14.3 Conclusion: Crucial Aspects of an Effective Coaching Relationship --
15. The Development of Airline Pilot Skills through Simulated Practice --
15.1 Pilot Training --
15.2 Early Flight and Pilot Training --
15.3 Pilot Education in the Jet Age --
15.4 Influences on Major Aviation Training --
15.4.1 Crew Resource Management and Nontechnical Skills --
15.4.2 Technology --
15.4.3 Simulation --
15.5 Pilot Training into the Future --
15.6 Practice-based Learning in Aviation.
Series Title: Professional and practice-based learning, v. 1.
Responsibility: Stephen Billett, editor.

Abstract:

The contributions to this volume explore ways in which learning through practice can be conceptualised, enacted, and appraised through an analysis of the traditions, purposes, and processes that  Read more...

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Learning through and about Practice: A Lifeworld Perspective -- 6.1 A Need to Reexamine Learning through Practice -- 6.2 Historical Development of Lifeworld Perspective -- 6.3 Ways of Being in Workplace Contexts -- 6.4 Learning Ways of Being in Higher Education Contexts -- 6.5 Learning from a Lifeworld Perspective: Developing Ways of Being -- 7. Conceptualising Professional Identification as Flexibility, Stability and Ambivalence -- 7.1. Learning and Professional Identification as Life Politics -- 7.1.1 Flexibility {u2013} Stability {u2013} Ambivalence -- 7.2 Empirical Data -- 7.3 Becoming an Engineer or a Physician -- 7.3.1 Becoming an Engineer -- 7.3.2 Becoming a Physician -- 7.4 Being an Engineer or a Physician -- 7.4.1 Identification as a Flexible Strategy or a Permanent State -- 7.4.2 Engineer {u2013} Confined to Workplace, Occupation, and Hours -- 7.4.3 Physician {u2013} Profession Associated with Personality -- 7.5 Flexibility, Stability, and Ambivalence in Practice -- 7.6 Work, Life Politics, and Sustainable Life -- 7.6.1 Lifelong Qualification as Exclusion -- 7.6.2 Learning and Professional Identification as Life Politics -- 7.7 Concluding Remarks -- 8. Developing Vocational Practice and Social Capital in Jewellery -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Workplace and Practice-based Learning -- 8.3 The Development of Work Placement Scheme in the Jewellery Industry -- 8.4 The Development of Vocational Practice in the Jewellery Industry -- 8.5 Practice-based Learning: Epistemic and Pedagogic Issues -- 8.6 Conclusion -- 9. Guidance as an Interactional Accomplishment Practice-based Learning within the Swiss VET System -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Apprenticeship in the Swiss VET System -- 9.3 Researching Vocational Learning and Language-in-Interaction -- 9.4 An Interactional Approach to Guidance in the Workplace -- 9.4.1 Spontaneous Guidance -- 9.4.2 Requested Guidance -- 9.4.3 Distributed Guidance -- 9.4.4 Denied Guidance -- 9.5 Concluding Remarks and Practical Implications -- 10. Cooperative Education: Integrating Classroom and Workplace Learning -- 10.1 Cooperative Education as a Model of Practice-based Learning -- 10.2 The Development of Cooperative Education -- 10.3 The Organisational Milieu of Cooperative Education -- 10.4 Theorising Learning in Cooperative Education -- 10.5 Integrating Classroom and Workplace Learning -- 10.6 The Real Value of Cooperative Education -- 11. Individual Learning Paths of Employees in the Context of Social Networks -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Viewing the Organisation as a Network of Actors -- 11.3 Learning-Relevant Experiences Gained from the Work Network -- 11.3.1 How Actors Organise Work: A Cycle -- 11.3.2 Four Ideal Types of Work Process -- 11.3.3 Three Dimensions in Work-Network Structures -- 11.4 Learning-Relevant Experiences Gained in the Learning Network -- 11.4.1 Actors Organise Learning Networks: A Cycle -- 11.4.2 Actors Create Learning Programmes -- 11.4.3 Four Ideal Types of Learning Network -- 11.4.4 The Importance of Actors{u2019} Action Theories -- 11.5 How do Employees create their Individual Learning Paths? -- 11.6 Learning, Networks, Structure, and Agency -- 12. Apprenticeships: What happens in On-the-Job Training (OJT)? -- 12.1 Apprenticeship and Learning -- 12.1.1 Institutional History of Apprenticeship Programmes in the US -- 12.2 Methodology of this Study -- 12.3 The Physical Context of the Classroom as compared to the Field -- 12.4 On the Job: The Worksite itself as Resource for Learning -- 12.5 On the Job: Tools and Equipment as Resources for Learning -- 12.6 Learning Through Interaction without Master-Apprentice Relationships -- 12.7 Learning and the {u2018}Bottom Line{u2019} -- 12.8 What can go Wrong -- 12.9 Apprenticeship Learning as Reproduction of the Economic Viability -- 12.10 Conclusion -- 13. Interactive Research as a Strategy for Practice-based Learninge -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Towards a Model of Competence Development -- 13.3 Cultural Context of Teachers{u2019} Learning and Professional Growth -- 13.4 Interactive Research -- 13.5 The Interactive Processes {u2013} The {u2018}Quality Case{u2019} -- 13.5.1 Local Schools{u2019} Collective Competence Development -- 13.6 The Practice-based Model -- 13.6.1 Identifying Practice -- 13.6.2 Reflective Transformation -- 13.6.3 Joint Construction and Institutionalisation of Tools -- 13.6.4 Professional Growth and Remaking of Practice -- 14. The Relationship between Coach and Coachees -- 14.1 Coaching -- 14.1.1 The Coaching Relationship -- 14.2 Coachees{u2019} Accounts of the Coaching Relationship -- 14.3 Conclusion: Crucial Aspects of an Effective Coaching Relationship -- 15. The Development of Airline Pilot Skills through Simulated Practice -- 15.1 Pilot Training -- 15.2 Early Flight and Pilot Training -- 15.3 Pilot Education in the Jet Age -- 15.4 Influences on Major Aviation Training -- 15.4.1 Crew Resource Management and Nontechnical Skills -- 15.4.2 Technology -- 15.4.3 Simulation -- 15.5 Pilot Training into the Future -- 15.6 Practice-based Learning in Aviation."@en ;
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