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Lectures on jurisprudence

Author: Adam Smith; Ronald L Meek; D D Raphael; Peter Stein
Publisher: Indianapolis : Liberty Classics, 1982, ©1978.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Smith's Lectures on Jurisprudence, originally delivered at the University of Glasgow in 1762-1763, present his "theory of the rules by which civil government ought to be directed." The chief purpose of government, according to Smith, is to preserve justice; and "the object of justice is security from injury." The state must protect the individual's right to his person, property, reputation, and social relations.  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Smith; Ronald L Meek; D D Raphael; Peter Stein
ISBN: 0865970114 9780865970113
OCLC Number: 8171041
Notes: Reprint. Originally published: Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1978.
Includes indexes.
Description: viii, 42, 610 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: List of Abbreviations --
Introduction --
Acknowledgements --
Lectures on Jurisprudence Report of 1762 --
Report dated 1766 --
'Early Draft' of Part of The Wealth of Nations --
First Fragment on the Division of Labour --
Second Fragment on the Division of Labour --
Index of Roman Law and Medieval Law Sources --
Index of Acts of the English and United Kingdom Parliaments --
Index of Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland --
Index of Legal Cases --
Index of Authorities --
General Index
Responsibility: Adam Smith ; edited by R.L. Meek, D.D. Raphael, and P.G. Stein.

Abstract:

Smith's Lectures on Jurisprudence, originally delivered at the University of Glasgow in 1762-1763, present his "theory of the rules by which civil government ought to be directed." The chief purpose of government, according to Smith, is to preserve justice; and "the object of justice is security from injury." The state must protect the individual's right to his person, property, reputation, and social relations. Building on his Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith argues that the state must act as an impartial spectator, judging when an individual has been injured. The state must then design and apply civil and criminal laws to prevent further injuries and punish transgressors. Laws are also the means by which the state promotes public prosperity. Thus, regulations concerning trade, commerce, and production must be crafted so as to encourage rather than interfere with our productive capacities.

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