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Lectures on logic. Vol. 2

Author: William Hamilton, Sir; Henry Longueville Mansel; John Veitch
Publisher: Edinburgh : William Blackwood and Sons, 1866.
Series: Lectures on metaphysics and logic; Lectures on metaphysics and logic.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 2nd ed., revView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A Science is a complement of cognitions, having, in point of form, the character of logical perfection; in point of matter, the character of real truth. The constituent attributes of logical perfection are the perspicuity, the completeness, the harmony, of knowledge. But the perspicuity, completeness, and harmony of our cognitions are, for the human mind, possible only through method. Method in general denotes a  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: William Hamilton, Sir; Henry Longueville Mansel; John Veitch
OCLC Number: 657602689
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2010. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement.
Description: x, 520 p.
Contents: Lecture XXIV. Pure logic --
Lecture XXV. Methodology --
Lecture XXVI. Methodology --
Lecture XXVIII. Modified stoicheiology --
Lecture XXIX. Modified stoicheiology --
Lecture XXX. Modified stoicheiology --
Lecture XXXI. Modified stoicheiology --. Lecture XXXII. Modified methodology --
Lecture XXXIII. Modified methodology --
Lecture XXXIV. Modified methodology --
Lecture XXXV. Modified methodology --
Lecture XXVII. Modified logic.
Series Title: Lectures on metaphysics and logic; Lectures on metaphysics and logic.
Other Titles: PsycBooks.

Abstract:

"A Science is a complement of cognitions, having, in point of form, the character of logical perfection; in point of matter, the character of real truth. The constituent attributes of logical perfection are the perspicuity, the completeness, the harmony, of knowledge. But the perspicuity, completeness, and harmony of our cognitions are, for the human mind, possible only through method. Method in general denotes a procedure in the treatment of an object, conducted according to determinate rules. Method, in reference to science, denotes, therefore, the arrangement and elaboration of cognitions according to definite rules, with the view of conferring on these a logical perfection. The methods by which we proceed in the treatment of the objects of our knowledge are two; or rather method, considered in its integrity, consists of two processes, --analysis and synthesis"--Chapter. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

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