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Life counts : cataloguing life on earth

Author: Michael Gleich; United Nations Environment Programme.; et al
Publisher: New York : Atlantic Monthly Press, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Six billion people live on earth, but we share the planet with trillions of other life-forms, ranging from bacteria to whales. They make up life's infrastructure and are in effect the underpinnings of human existence. Life counts shows why we must preserve this biodiversity: if we don't, scientists predict, the earth may lose the ability to support its inhabitants within the next fifty years. Through color  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Statistics
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Gleich; United Nations Environment Programme.; et al
ISBN: 0871138468 9780871138460
OCLC Number: 48559494
Description: 284 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 28 cm.
Contents: Statisticians on safari: our methods for counting the world --
Fossils: nature's methods for counting the world --
The great chroniclers: changing resaons for studying nature --
Human censuses: changing reasons for studying human populations --
Expedition to planet Earth: the world we have yet to discover --
Extinctions: losing species before their roles are understood --
Threatened and threatening: our love-hate relationship with nature and its conservation --
Progress through catastrophes: how extinctions further evolution --
Sustainable use: a new method for protecting species --
Wild economics: calculating nature's worth --
Fair dealing: who gets nature's dividends --
Preserving diversity: the next fifty years --
Maxing out: how many people can the earth support? --
The future of life --
Humans and nature in numbers.
Responsibility: by Michael Gleich ... [et al.] ; translated by Steven Rendall ; in collaboration with UNEP, the United National Environment Programme ... [et al.].

Abstract:

Six billion people live on earth, but we share the planet with trillions of other life-forms, ranging from bacteria to whales. They make up life's infrastructure and are in effect the underpinnings of human existence. Life counts shows why we must preserve this biodiversity: if we don't, scientists predict, the earth may lose the ability to support its inhabitants within the next fifty years. Through color illustrations and narration, readers learn that each animal on earth--whose numbers are greater than our galaxy's stars--as well as each plant and each microbe, plays a role essential to the life of the planet and, in surprising ways, human economies and health. The authors weigh scientist's and international governments' best ideas on how we can protect these living things and hence our world. Life counts: a worldwide balance sheet is part of the larger Life Counts Project, designed to raise awareness across the globe of the importance of the world's biodiversity.

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