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Life, myth, and art in Ancient Rome

Author: Tony Allan
Publisher: Los Angeles, CA : J. Paul Getty Museum, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Life, Myth, and Art in Ancient Rome celebrates the many achievements of Roman culture and delves into its dark side. Romans erected structures so well built and engineered that they still stand millennia later, yet these same buildings also showcased blood sports as public entertainment. The Romans instituted just government, impartial legal and political institutions, and concepts of citizenship, yet its  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Allan, Tony, 1946-
Life, myth, and art in Ancient Rome.
Los Angeles, CA : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2005
(OCoLC)767558867
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Tony Allan
ISBN: 0892368217 9780892368211
OCLC Number: 58918722
Description: 144 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Contents: The soul of the Romans --
The story of the Romans --
The Etruscan heritage --
The art of Rome --
The architecture of Rome --
The eternal city --
The Roman forum --
Patricians and plebians --
Portraits for posterity --
Slaves and freedman --
Senators, consuls, and tribunes --
First among equals : the emperor --
Embelms of power --
Conquest and glory --
Philosophers and poets --
Romans and barbarians --
Battles commemorated --
Childhood and schooling --
The Roman home --
The art of mosaic --
Feats of engineering --
The domestic world --
Roman women --
Food and drink --
The warehouse of the world --
Riches of the Nile --
Town and country --
The Roman stage --
Performance and identity : the mask --
Sport and spectacle --
The Colosseum --
The wanderings of Aeneas --
Romulus and Remus --
The birth of Rome --
Tyrants and lawgivers --
Citizen heroes --
Legends of the emperors --
Emperors as gods --
The Roman pantheon --
The great goddesses --
A shrine for all the gods --
Spirits of the home --
Gods of feasts and festivals --
Gods of the provinces --
The Villa of the Mysteries --
Temples and shrines --
Divination and the oracles --
The triumph of Christianity --
The end of empire --
Chronology --
Roman emperors.
Responsibility: Tony Allan.
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Abstract:

"Life, Myth, and Art in Ancient Rome celebrates the many achievements of Roman culture and delves into its dark side. Romans erected structures so well built and engineered that they still stand millennia later, yet these same buildings also showcased blood sports as public entertainment. The Romans instituted just government, impartial legal and political institutions, and concepts of citizenship, yet its population included slaves as well as patricians and plebeians, and was often riven by intrigue, superstition, and savagery." "This volume is an illustrated introduction to a fascinating, and at times paradoxical, civilization and its art and architecture, ranging from magnificent temples and aqueducts, to exquisite mosaics and jewelry. Placing the art in its cultural context, the author covers themes that have long inspired the Western imagination, including the rise and fall of emperors, the life and death of the gladiator, the belief in omens and prophecy, and, ultimately, the establishment of Christianity."--BOOK JACKET.

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