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The life of Benjamin Banneker

Author: Silvio A Bedini
Publisher: New York : Scribner, 1971, ©1972.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Originally published by Scribner in 1972 to wide praise and critical acclaim, Silvio Bedini's work remains the definitive biography of Benjamin Banneker, the self-educated mathematician and astronomer who became America's first black scientist. Born a free man in Maryland in 1731, he had little formal education but developed a remarkable aptitude for mathematics. He assisted in surveying the area that was to become  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bedini, Silvio A.
Life of Benjamin Banneker.
New York, Scribner [1971, ©1972]
(OCoLC)593414330
Online version:
Bedini, Silvio A.
Life of Benjamin Banneker.
New York, Scribner [1971, ©1972]
(OCoLC)603641472
Named Person: Benjamin Banneker; Benjamin Banneker
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Silvio A Bedini
ISBN: 0684125749 9780684125749 0684134985 9780684134987
OCLC Number: 241422
Description: xvii, 434 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: The heritage and the land --
Home and family --
Friends and neighbors --
Work and study --
The great adventure --
His first almanac --
The years of fulfillment --
Scientific considerations --
The final years --
The man remembered.
Responsibility: Silvio A. Bedini.

Abstract:

Originally published by Scribner in 1972 to wide praise and critical acclaim, Silvio Bedini's work remains the definitive biography of Benjamin Banneker, the self-educated mathematician and astronomer who became America's first black scientist. Born a free man in Maryland in 1731, he had little formal education but developed a remarkable aptitude for mathematics. He assisted in surveying the area that was to become the District of Columbia, but his real achievement came with the creation of almanacs. Through much of the 1790s, his work influenced daily life in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. In 1791 he took up his pen and wrote to Thomas Jefferson, arguing that the treatment of blacks in the young United States was unwarranted and unfair.

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Linked Data


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