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A life of James Boswell

Author: Peter Martin
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"For almost one hundred and fifty years after his death, James Boswell (1740-1795) was known chiefly as the author of one of the supreme achievements in biography, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1791)." "Then in the 1920s and '30s in Ireland and Scotland came discoveries of masses of his papers, including the copious personal journals he kept for most of his life, long thought to have been destroyed." "His journals  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: James Boswell; James Boswell; James Boswell; James Boswell
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Peter Martin
ISBN: 0300084897 9780300084894
OCLC Number: 45175811
Description: x, 613 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Contents: A world of chimeras --
Edinburgh gloom --
Escape to London --
Early scribblings --
Harvest jaunt --
London : the promised land --
'The Johnsonian aether' --
Utrecht : acquiring a noble character --
Zelide --
'Let me be Boswell' : touring Germany and Switzerland --
"Above the vulgar crowd : meeting Rousseau and Voltaire --
O Italy --
'Like embroidery upon gauze : Corsica, law, and propaganda --
'Happy as an unmarried man can be' --
'The rage for matrimony' --
Settling down : 'The antechamber of his mind' --
'The down upon a plum' --
The Hebrides --
Post-Hebrides : ominous Edinburgh flatness --
Picking up fragments --
'Inexplicable dilatory disease' --
Later thirties - 'the author and the gentleman united' --
No considerable figure : politics, family, hypochondria --
The road to Ulubrae-Auchinloeck --
The cracked enamel --
From death to biography --
'Oh, if this book of mine were done!' --
Painful progress --
The Life of Johnson and its aftermath.
Responsibility: Peter Martin.

Abstract:

"For almost one hundred and fifty years after his death, James Boswell (1740-1795) was known chiefly as the author of one of the supreme achievements in biography, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1791)." "Then in the 1920s and '30s in Ireland and Scotland came discoveries of masses of his papers, including the copious personal journals he kept for most of his life, long thought to have been destroyed." "His journals reveal him as the rarest and most complex of human beings: a man of eternal boyhood, loved and admired for his geniality and high spirits, yet also mocked and chastened by people who could or would not understand him. His life traced violent conflicts and grotesque juxtapositions; he was a study in volatility, a loose cannon to be kept at arm's length, a "singular" man who could both endear and repel."--BOOK JACKET.

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