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Light is a messenger : the life and science of William Lawrence Bragg

Author: Graeme K Hunter
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Light is a Messenger is the first biography of William Lawrence Bragg, who was only 25 when he won the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics - the youngest person ever to win a Nobel Prize. It describes how Bragg discovered how to use X-rays to determine the arrangement of atoms in crystals and his pivotal role in developing this technique to the point that the structures of the most complex molecules known to Man - the
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Genre/Form: Biographie
Biography
Named Person: William Lawrence Bragg, Sir; William Lawrence Bragg; William Lawrence Bragg, Sir
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Graeme K Hunter
ISBN: 019852921X 9780198529217
OCLC Number: 54806124
Description: xxi, 301 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: A shy and reserved person: Adelaide, 1886-1908 --
Concatenation of fortunate circumstances: Cambridge, 1909-14 --
Our show is going famously: World War One --
A system of simple and elegant architecture: Manchester, 1919-30 --
Plus-plus chemistry: Manchester, 1931-7 --
Supreme position in British physics: The National Physical Laboratory and Cambridge, 1937-9 --
He will have to be Sir Lawrence: World War Two --
A message in code which we cannot yet decipher: Cambridge, 1945-53 --
The art of popular lecturing on scientific subjects: The Royal Institution, 1954-66 --
A very difficult affair indeed: retirement, 1966-71.
Responsibility: Graeme K. Hunter.
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Abstract:

Sir Lawrence Bragg was only 25 when he won the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics - the youngest person ever to win a Nobel Prize. Bragg won the Nobel Prize for discovering how to use X-rays to determine  Read more...

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This book will be a key starting point for further work. Jeff Hughes, Ambix

 
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