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Lincoln's greatest speech : the second inaugural

Verfasser/in: Ronald C White
Verlag: New York : Simon & Schuster, [2002] ©2002
Ausgabe/Format   Buch : Biografie : EnglischAlle Ausgaben und Formate anzeigen
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
"After four years of unspeakable horror and sacrifice on both sides, the Civil War was about to end. On March 4, 1865, at his Second Inaugural, President Lincoln did not offer the North the victory speech it yearned for, nor did he blame the South solely for the sin of slavery. Calling the whole nation to account, Lincoln offered a moral framework for peace and reconciliation. The speech was greeted with  Weiterlesen…
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Gattung/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Inaugural addresses
Physisches Format Online version:
White, Ronald C. (Ronald Cedric), 1939-
Lincoln's greatest speech.
New York : Simon & Schuster, c2002
(OCoLC)647255761
Name: Abraham Lincoln; Abraham Lincoln; Abraham Lincoln; Abraham Lincoln
Medientyp: Biografie, Internetquelle
Dokumenttyp: Buch, Internet-Ressource
Alle Autoren: Ronald C White
ISBN: 0743212983 9780743212984 0743212991 9780743212991
OCLC-Nummer: 48249221
Beschreibung: 254 pages, 8 pages of plates : illultrations ; 23 cm
Inhalt: Inauguration Day --
"At this second appearing ..." --
"And the war came." --
"... somehow, the cause of the war ..." --
"Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God ..." --
"The Almighty has His own purposes." --
"... every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another drawn with the sword ..." --
"With malice toward none; with charity for all ..." --
"... better than anything I have produced, but ... it is not immediately popular." --
The Text of the Second Inaugural Address --
Lincoln's "Little Speech": Letter to Albert G. Hodges --
Abraham Lincoln: "Meditation on the Divine Will".
Verfasserangabe: Ronald C. White, Jr.
Weitere Informationen:

Abstract:

"After four years of unspeakable horror and sacrifice on both sides, the Civil War was about to end. On March 4, 1865, at his Second Inaugural, President Lincoln did not offer the North the victory speech it yearned for, nor did he blame the South solely for the sin of slavery. Calling the whole nation to account, Lincoln offered a moral framework for peace and reconciliation. The speech was greeted with indifference, misunderstanding, and hostility by many in the Union. But it was a great work, the victorious culmination of Lincoln's own lifelong struggle with the issue of slavery, and he well understood it to be his most profound speech. Eventually this "with malice toward none" address would be accepted and revered as one of the greatest in the nation's history." "In 703 words, delivered slowly, Lincoln transformed the meaning of the suffering brought about by the Civil War. He offered reunification, not revenge. Among those present were black soldiers and confederate deserters, ordinary citizens from all over, the black leader Frederick Douglass, the Cabinet, and other notables. John Wilkes Booth is visible in the crowd behind the president as he addresses posterity."--BOOK JACKET.

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Lincoln's Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural

von gjebbia (Veröffentlicht von WorldCat-Nutzern/innen 2006-09-13) Ausgezeichnet Permalink
White offers commentary and analysis of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address and also offers insight into Lincoln's rhetorical style, political motivations, and religious beliefs. He shows how this very short speech reveals Lincoln's flexible and evolving position on the issue of slavery, his fidelity...
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