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Linux bible : the comprehensive, tutorial resource : build Linux desktop and server skills : advance to enterprise-level computing : become a Linux system admin or power user

Author: Chris Negus; Christine Bresnahan
Publisher: Indianapolis, Ind. : John Wiley & Sons, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 8th edView all editions and formats
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More than 50 percent new and revised content for today's Linux environment gets you up and running in no time!  Read more...

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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Chris Negus; Christine Bresnahan
OCLC Number: 824773748
Description: 1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
Contents: Introduction xxxiii <p>Part I: Getting Started 1 <p>Chapter 1: Starting with Linux 3 <p>Understanding What Linux Is 4 <p>Understanding How Linux Differs from Other Operating Systems 5 <p>Exploring Linux History 6 <p>Free-fl owing UNIX culture at Bell Labs 7 <p>Commercialized UNIX 9 <p>Berkeley Software Distribution arrives 9 <p>UNIX Laboratory and commercialization 9 <p>GNU transitions UNIX to freedom 11 <p>BSD loses some steam 12 <p>Linus builds the missing piece 13 <p>OSI open source definition 14 <p>Understanding How Linux Distributions Emerged 15 <p>Choosing a Red Hat distribution 16 <p>Using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 17 <p>Using Fedora 18 <p>Choosing Ubuntu or another Debian distribution 18 <p>Finding Professional Opportunities with Linux Today 19 <p>Understanding how companies make money with Linux 20 <p>Becoming Red Hat Certified 21 <p>RHCSA topics 22 <p>RHCE topics 23 <p>Summary 24 <p>Chapter 2: Creating the Perfect Linux Desktop 27 <p>Understanding Linux Desktop Technology 28 <p>Starting with the Fedora GNOME Desktop Live CD 30 <p>Using the GNOME 3 Desktop 31 <p>After the computer boots up 31 <p>Navigating with the mouse 32 <p>Navigating with the keyboard 36 <p>Setting up the GNOME 3 desktop 38 <p>Extending the GNOME 3 desktop 39 <p>Using GNOME shell extensions 39 <p>Using the GNOME Tweak Tool 40 <p>Starting with desktop applications 42 <p>Managing fi les and folders with Nautilus 42 <p>Installing and managing additional software 44 <p>Playing music with Rhythmbox 45 <p>Stopping the GNOME 3 desktop 46 <p>Using the GNOME 2 Desktop 46 <p>Using the Metacity window manager 48 <p>Changing GNOME appearance 49 <p>Using the GNOME panels 50 <p>Using the Applications and System menus 51 <p>Adding an applet 51 <p>Adding another panel 52 <p>Adding an application launcher 52 <p>Adding a drawer 53 <p>Changing panel properties 53 <p>3D effects with AIGLX 54 <p>Summary 57 <p>Exercises 57 <p>Part II: Becoming a Linux Power User 59 <p>Chapter 3: Using the Shell 61 <p>About Shells and Terminal Windows 62 <p>Using the shell prompt 63 <p>Using a terminal window 64 <p>Using virtual consoles 65 <p>Choosing Your Shell 65 <p>Running Commands 66 <p>Understanding command syntax 67 <p>Locating commands 70 <p>Recalling Commands Using Command History 72 <p>Command-line editing 73 <p>Command-line completion 75 <p>Command-line recall 76 <p>Connecting and Expanding Commands 78 <p>Piping between commands 78 <p>Sequential commands 79 <p>Background commands 79 <p>Expanding commands 80 <p>Expanding arithmetic expressions 80 <p>Expanding variables 81 <p>Using Shell Variables 81 <p>Creating and using aliases 83 <p>Exiting the shell 84 <p>Creating Your Shell Environment 84 <p>Confi guring your shell 84 <p>Setting your prompt 85 <p>Adding environment variables 87 <p>Getting Information About Commands 88 <p>Summary 90 <p>Exercises 90 <p>Chapter 4: Moving Around the Filesystem 93 <p>Using Basic Filesystem Commands 96 <p>Using Metacharacters and Operators 98 <p>Using file-matching metacharacters 98 <p>Using file-redirection metacharacters 99 <p>Using brace expansion characters 101 <p>Listing Files and Directories 101 <p>Understanding File Permissions and Ownership 105 <p>Changing permissions with chmod (numbers)107 <p>Changing permissions with chmod (letters) 107 <p>Setting default file permission with umask 108 <p>Changing file ownership 109 <p>Moving, Copying, and Removing Files 110 <p>Summary 111 <p>Exercises 112 <p>Chapter 5: Working with Text Files 113 <p>Editing Files with vim and vi 113 <p>Starting with vi 115 <p>Adding text 115 <p>Moving around in the text 116 <p>Deleting, copying, and changing text 117 <p>Pasting (putting) text 118 <p>Repeating commands 118 <p>Exiting vi 118 <p>Skipping around in the file 119 <p>Searching for text 120 <p>Using ex mode 120 <p>Learning more about vi and vim 120 <p>Finding Files 121 <p>Using locate to find files by name 121 <p>Searching for files with find 122 <p>Finding files by name 123 <p>Finding files by size 124 <p>Finding files by user 124 <p>Finding files by permission 125 <p>Finding files by date and time 126 <p>Using not and or when finding files 126 <p>Finding files and executing commands 127 <p>Searching in files with grep 128 <p>Summary 129 <p>Exercises 130 <p>Chapter 6: Managing Running Processes 131 <p>Understanding Processes 131 <p>Listing Processes 132 <p>Listing processes with ps 132 <p>Listing and changing processes with top 134 <p>Listing processes with System Monitor 135 <p>Managing Background and Foreground Processes 137 <p>Starting background processes138 <p>Using foreground and background commands 139 <p>Killing and Renicing Processes 140 <p>Killing processes with kill and killall 140 <p>Using kill to signal processes by PID 141 <p>Using killall to signal processes by name 141 <p>Setting processor priority with nice and renice 142 <p>Summary 143 <p>Exercises 143 <p>Chapter 7: Writing Simple Shell Scripts 145 <p>Understanding Shell Scripts 145 <p>Executing and debugging shell scripts 146 <p>Understanding shell variables 147 <p>Special shell positional parameters 148 <p>Reading in parameters 149 <p>Parameter expansion in bash 149 <p>Performing arithmetic in shell scripts 150 <p>Using programming constructs in shell scripts 151 <p>The if then statements 151 <p>The case command 154 <p>The for do loop 155 <p>The while do and until do loops 156 <p>Trying some useful text manipulation programs 157 <p>The general regular expression parser 157 <p>Remove sections of lines of text (cut) 158 <p>Translate or delete characters (tr) 158 <p>The stream editor (sed) 158 <p>Using simple shell scripts 159 <p>Telephone list 159 <p>Backup script 160 <p>Summary 161 <p>Exercises 161 <p>Part III: Becoming a Linux System Administrator 163 <p>Chapter 8: Learning System Administration 165 <p>Understanding System Administration 165 <p>Using Graphical Administration Tools 167 <p>Using the root User Account 169 <p>Becoming root from the shell (su command) 170 <p>Allowing administrative access via the GUI 171 <p>Gaining administrative access with sudo 172 <p>Exploring Administrative Commands, Configuration Files, and Log Files 174 <p>Administrative commands 174 <p>Administrative configuration files 175 <p>Administrative log files 179 <p>Using Other Administrative Accounts 180 <p>Checking and Configuring Hardware 181 <p>Checking your hardware182 <p>Managing removable hardware 184 <p>Working with loadable modules 186 <p>Listing loaded modules 187 <p>Loading modules 187 <p>Removing modules 188 <p>Summary 188 <p>Exercises 189 <p>Chapter 9: Installing Linux 191 <p>Choosing a Computer 192 <p>Installing Fedora from a Live CD 193 <p>Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux from Installation Media 199 <p>Installing Linux in the Enterprise 202 <p>Exploring Common Installation Topics 204 <p>Upgrading or installing from scratch 204 <p>Dual booting 205 <p>Installing Linux to run virtually 206 <p>Using installation boot options 207 <p>Boot options for disabling features 207 <p>Boot options for video problems 208 <p>Boot options for special installation types 208 <p>Boot options for kickstarts and remote repositories 209 <p>Miscellaneous boot options 210 <p>Using specialized storage 210 <p>Partitioning hard drives 211 <p>Understanding different partition types 212 <p>Partitioning during Fedora installation 212 <p>Reasons for different partitioning schemes 216 <p>Tips for creating partitions 216 <p>Using the GRUB boot loader 218 <p>Using GRUB Legacy (version 1) 218 <p>Using GRUB 2 223 <p>Summary 224 <p>Exercises 225 <p>Chapter 10: Getting and Managing Software 227 <p>Managing Software with PackageKit 227 <p>Enabling repositories and getting updates 228 <p>Searching for packages 229 <p>Installing and removing packages 230 <p>Going beyond PackageKit 231 <p>Understanding Linux RPM Software Packaging 231 <p>Understanding RPM packaging 232 <p>What is in an RPM? 233 <p>Where do RPMs come from? 234 <p>Installing RPMs 234 <p>Managing RPM Packages with YUM 235 <p>Understanding how yum works 235 <p>1 Checking /etc/yumconf 236 <p>2 Checking /etc/sysconfig/rhn/up2date (RHEL only) 237 <p>3 Checking /etc/yumreposd/repo files 237 <p>4 Downloading RPM packages and metadata from a YUM repository 238 <p>5 RPM packages installed to Linux file system 238 <p>6 Store YUM repository metadata to local RPM database 238 <p>Using YUM with third-party software repositories 239 <p>Managing software with the YUM command 240 <p>Searching for packages 240 <p>Installing and removing packages 242 <p>Updating packages 243 <p>Updating groups of packages 244 <p>Maintaining your RPM package database and cache 245 <p>Downloading RPMs from a yum repository 246 <p>Installing, Querying, and Verifying Software with the rpm Command 246 <p>Installing and removing packages with rpm 247 <p>Querying rpm information 247 <p>Verifying RPM packages 249 <p>Managing Software in the Enterprise 250 <p>Summary 251 <p>Exercises 252 <p>Chapter 11: Managing User Accounts 253 <p>Creating User Accounts 253 <p>Adding users with useradd 256 <p>Setting user defaults 259 <p>Modifying users with usermod 260 <p>Deleting users with userdel 261 <p>Understanding Group Accounts 262 <p>Using group accounts 262 <p>Creating group accounts 263 <p>Managing Users in the Enterprise 264 <p>Setting permissions with Access Control Lists 265 <p>Setting ACLs with setfacl 265 <p>Setting default ACLs 267 <p>Enabling ACLs 268 <p>Adding directories for users to collaborate 270 <p>Creating group collaboration directories (set GID bit) 270 <p>Creating restricted deletion directories (sticky bit) 271 <p>Centralizing User Accounts 272 <p>Using the Authentication Configuration window 273 <p>Summary 274 <p>Exercises 275 <p>Chapter 12: Managing Disks and Filesystems 277 <p>Understanding Disk Storage 277 <p>Partitioning Hard Disks 279 <p>Viewing disk partitions 280 <p>Creating a single-partition disk 281 <p>Creating a multiple-partition disk 284 <p>Using Logical Volume Management Partitions 288 <p>Checking an existing LVM 288 <p>Creating LVM logical volumes 291 <p>Growing LVM logical volumes 293 <p>Mounting Filesystems 293 <p>Supported filesystems 294 <p>Enabling swap areas 296 <p>Disabling swap area 297 <p>Using the fstab file to define mountable file systems 297 <p>Using the mount command to mount file systems 300 <p>Mounting a disk image in loopback 301 <p>Using the umount command 301 <p>Using the mkfs Command to Create a Filesystem 302 <p>Summary 303 <p>Exercises 303 <p>Part IV: Becoming a Linux Server Administrator 305 <p>Chapter 13: Understanding Server Administration 307 <p>Starting with Server Administration 308 <p>Step 1: Install the server 308 <p>Step 2: Configure the server 310 <p>Using configuration files 310 <p>Checking the default configuration 310 <p>Step 3: Start the server 311 <p>Step 4: Secure the server 312 <p>Password protection 313 <p>Firewalls 313 <p>TCP Wrappers313 <p>SELinux 313 <p>Security settings in configuration files 314 <p>Step 5: Monitor the server 314 <p>Confi gure logging 314 <p>Run system activity reports 314 <p>Keep system software up to date 314 <p>Check the fi lesystem for signs of crackers 315 <p>Managing Remote Access with the Secure Shell Service 315 <p>Starting the openssh-server service 316 <p>Using SSH client tools 317 <p>Using ssh for remote login 318 <p>Using ssh for remote execution 319 <p>Copying files between systems with scp and rsync 320 <p>Interactive copying with sftp 323 <p>Using key-based (passwordless) authentication 323 <p>Confi guring System Logging 325 <p>Enabling system logging with rsyslog 325 <p>Understanding the rsyslogconf file 326 <p>Understanding the messages log file 327 <p>Setting up and using a loghost with rsyslogd 328 <p>Watching logs with logwatch 329 <p>Checking System Resources with sar 330 <p>Checking System Space 332 <p>Displaying system space with df 332 <p>Checking disk usage with du 333 <p>Finding disk consumption with find 333 <p>Summary 334 <p>Exercises 335 <p>Chapter 14: Administering Networking 337 <p>Configuring Networking for Desktops 338 <p>Checking your network interfaces 340 <p>Checking your network from NetworkManager 340 <p>Checking your network from the command line 342 <p>Configuring network interfaces 345 <p>Configuring a network proxy connection 347 <p>Configuring Networking for Servers 348 <p>Using system-config-network 349 <p>Choosing device configuration 350 <p>Choosing DNS configuration 351 <p>Understanding networking configuration files 351 <p>Network interface files 352 <p>Other networking files 353 <p>Setting alias network interfaces 356 <p>Setting up Ethernet channel bonding 357 <p>Setting custom routes 358 <p>Configuring Networking in the Enterprise 359 <p>Configuring Linux as a router 359 <p>Configuring Linux as a DHCP server 360 <p>Configuring Linux as a DNS server 361 <p>Configuring Linux as a proxy server 361 <p>Configuring VLANs in Linux 362 <p>Summary 363 <p>Exercises 363 <p>Chapter 15: Starting and Stopping Services 365 <p>Understanding the Linux init Daemon 365 <p>Understanding the classic init daemons 367 <p>Understanding the Upstart init daemon 375 <p>Learning Upstart init daemon basics 375 <p>Learning Upstart s backward compatibility to SysVinit 378 <p>Understanding systemd init 382 <p>Learning systemd basics 382 <p>Learning systemd s backward compatibility to SysVinit 388 <p>Auditing Services 390 <p>Auditing the classic SysVinit daemon 391 <p>Auditing the Upstart init daemon 392 <p>Auditing the systemd init393 <p>Stopping and Starting Services 394 <p>Stopping and starting the classic SysVinit daemon 395 <p>Stopping and starting the Upstart init daemon 396 <p>Stopping and starting the systemd daemon 397 <p>Stopping a service with systemd 397 <p>Starting a service with systemd 398 <p>Restarting a service with systemd 398 <p>Reloading a service with systemd 399 <p>Configuring Persistent Services 400 <p>Configuring the classic SysVinit daemon persistent services 400 <p>Configuring Upstart init daemon persistent services 401 <p>Configuring systemd init persistent services 402 <p>Enabling a service with systemd 402 <p>Disabling (removing) a service with systemd 402 <p>Configuring a Default runlevel or target unit 404 <p>Configuring the classic SysVinit daemon default runlevel 404 <p>Configuring the Upstart init daemon default runlevel 404 <p>Configuring the systemd init default target unit 405 <p>Adding New or Customized Services 406 <p>Adding new services to classic SysVinit daemon 406 <p>Step 1: Create a new or customized service script file 406 <p>Step 2: Move the service script 407 <p>Step 3: Add the service to runlevels 407 <p>Adding new services to the Upstart init daemon 408 <p>Adding new services to systemd init 410 <p>Step 1: Create a new or customized service configuration unit file 410 <p>Step 2: Move the service configuration unit file 411 <p>Step 3: Add the service to the Wants directory 412 <p>Summary 413 <p>Exercises 413 <p>Chapter 16: Configuring a Print Server 415 <p>Common UNIX Printing System 415 <p>Setting Up Printers 417 <p>Adding a printer automatically 417 <p>Using web-based CUPS administration 418 <p>Using the Printer Configuration window 420 <p>Configuring local printers with the Printer Configuration window 421 <p>Configuring remote printers 424 <p>Adding a remote CUPS printer 425 <p>Adding a remote UNIX (LDP/LPR) printer 425 <p>Adding a Windows (SMB) printer 426 <p>Working with CUPS Printing 427 <p>Configuring the CUPS server (cupsdconf) 427 <p>Starting the CUPS server 429 <p>Configuring CUPS printer options manually 429 <p>Using Printing Commands 431 <p>Printing with lpr 431 <p>Listing status with lpc 431 <p>Removing print jobs with lprm 432 <p>Configuring Print Servers 433 <p>Configuring a shared CUPS printer 433 <p>Configuring a shared Samba printer 435 <p>Understanding smbconf for printing 435 <p>Setting up SMB clients 436 <p>Summary 437 <p>Exercises 437 <p>Chapter 17: Configuring a Web Server 439 <p>Understanding the Apache Web Server 439 <p>Getting and Installing Your Web Server 440 <p>Understanding the httpd package 440 <p>Installing Apache 443 <p>Starting Apache 443 <p>Securing Apache 444 <p>Apache fi le permissions and ownership 445 <p>Apache and iptables 445 <p>Apache and SELinux 445 <p>Understanding the Apache configuration files 446 <p>Using directives 447 <p>Understanding default settings 449 <p>Adding a virtual host to Apache 451 <p>Allowing users to publish their own web content 453 <p>Securing your web traffic with SSL/TLS 455 <p>Understanding how SSL is configured 456 <p>Generating an SSL key and self-signed certificate 458 <p>Generating a certificate signing request 459 <p>Troubleshooting Your Web Server 460 <p>Checking for configuration errors 460 <p>Accessing forbidden and server internal errors 463 <p>Summary 464 <p>Exercises 464 <p>Chapter 18: Configuring an FTP Server 467 <p>Understanding FTP 467 <p>Installing the vsftpd FTP Server 469 <p>Starting the vsftpd Service 470 <p>Securing Your FTP Server 472 <p>Opening up your fi rewall for FTP 473 <p>Allowing FTP access in TCP wrappers 474 <p>Configuring SELinux for your FTP server 475 <p>Relating Linux file permissions to vsftpd 476 <p>Configuring Your FTP Server 477 <p>Setting up user access 477 <p>Allowing uploading 478 <p>Setting up vsftpd for the Internet 479 <p>Using FTP Clients to Connect to Your Server 481 <p>Accessing an FTP server from Firefox 481 <p>Accessing an FTP server with the lftp command 482 <p>Using the gFTP client 484 <p>Summary 485 <p>Exercises 485 <p>Chapter 19: Configuring a Windows File Sharing (Samba) Server 487 <p>Understanding Samba 487 <p>Installing Samba 488 <p>Starting and Stopping Samba 490 <p>Starting the Samba (smb) service 490 <p>Starting the NetBIOS (nmbd) name server 492 <p>Stopping the Samba (smb) and NetBIOS (nmb) services 493 <p>Securing Samba 494 <p>Configuring firewalls for Samba 495 <p>Configuring SELinux for Samba 496 <p>Setting SELinux Booleans for Samba 496 <p>Setting SELinux file contexts for Samba 497 <p>Configuring Samba host/user permissions 498 <p>Configuring Samba 498 <p>Using system-config-samba 498 <p>Choosing Samba server settings 499 <p>Configuring Samba user accounts 500 <p>Creating a Samba shared folder 501 <p>Checking the Samba share 502 <p>Configuring Samba in the smbconf file 503 <p>Configuring the [global] section 504 <p>Configuring the [homes] section505 <p>Configuring the [printers] section 506 <p>Creating custom shared directories 507 <p>Accessing Samba Shares 509 <p>Accessing Samba shares in Linux 509 <p>Accessing Samba shares in Windows 512 <p>Using Samba in the Enterprise 512 <p>Summary 513 <p>Exercises 513 <p>Chapter 20: Configuring an NFS File Server 515 <p>Installing an NFS Server 517 <p>Starting the NFS service 518 <p>Sharing NFS Filesystems 519 <p>Configuring the /etc/exports file 520 <p>Hostnames in /etc/exports 521 <p>Access options in /etc/exports 522 <p>User mapping options in /etc/exports 522 <p>Exporting the shared filesystems 523 <p>Securing Your NFS Server 523 <p>Opening up your fi rewall for NFS 524 <p>Allowing NFS access in TCP wrappers 525 <p>Confi guring SELinux for your NFS server 526 <p>Using NFS Filesystems 527 <p>Viewing NFS shares 527 <p>Manually mounting an NFS filesystem 527 <p>Mounting an NFS filesystem at boot time 528 <p>Mounting noauto filesystems 529 <p>Using mount options 530 <p>Using autofs to mount NFS filesystems on demand 532 <p>Automounting to the /net directory 532 <p>Automounting home directories 533 <p>Unmounting NFS fi esystems 535 <p>Summary 536 <p>Exercises 536 <p>Chapter 21: Troubleshooting Linux 539 <p>Boot-Up Troubleshooting 539 <p>Starting from the BIOS 540 <p>Troubleshooting BIOS setup 541 <p>Troubleshooting boot order 542 <p>Troubleshooting the GRUB boot loader 542 <p>Starting the kernel 545 <p>Troubleshooting the init process 546 <p>Troubleshooting rcsysinit 546 <p>Troubleshooting runlevel processes 547 <p>Troubleshooting Software Packages 551 <p>Fixing RPM databases and cache 555 <p>Troubleshooting Networking 556 <p>Troubleshooting outgoing connections 556 <p>View network interfaces 557 <p>Check physical connections557 <p>Check routes 557 <p>Check hostname resolution 558 <p>Troubleshooting incoming connections 560 <p>Check if the client can reach your system at all 560 <p>Check if the service is available to the client 560 <p>Check the firewall on the server 561 <p>Check the service on the server 562 <p>Troubleshooting Memory 563 <p>Uncovering memory issues 563 <p>Checking for memory problems 566 <p>Dealing with memory problems 567 <p>Troubleshooting in Rescue Mode 568 <p>Summary 569 <p>Exercises 570 <p>Part V: Learning Linux Security Techniques 571 <p>Chapter 22: Understanding Basic Linux Security 573 <p>Introducing the Security Process Lifecycle 573 <p>Examining the Planning Phase 575 <p>Choosing an access control model 575 <p>Discretionary Access Control 575 <p>Mandatory Access Control 576 <p>Role Based Access Control 576 <p>Using security checklists 577 <p>Access Control Matrix 577 <p>Industry security checklists 578 <p>Entering the Implementation Phase 578 <p>Implementing physical security 578 <p>Implementing disaster recovery 579 <p>Securing user accounts 580 <p>One user per user account 580 <p>No logins to the root account 581 <p>Setting expiration dates on temporary accounts 582 <p>Removing unused user accounts 583 <p>Securing passwords 585 <p>Choosing good passwords 585 <p>Setting and changing passwords 586 <p>Enforcing best password practices 587 <p>Understanding the password files and password hashes 590 <p>Securing the filesystem 591 <p>Managing dangerous filesystem permissions 591 <p>Securing the password files 592 <p>Locking down the filesystem 594 <p>Managing software and services 595 <p>Removing unused software and services 595 <p>Updating software packages 596 <p>Advanced implementation 596 <p>Working in the Monitoring Phase 596 <p>Monitoring log files 596 <p>Monitoring user accounts 600 <p>Detecting counterfeit new accounts and privileges 600 <p>Detecting bad account passwords 602 <p>Monitoring the filesystem 603 <p>Verifying software packages 604 <p>Scanning the filesystem 605 <p>Detecting viruses and rootkits 606 <p>Detecting an intrusion 608 <p>Working in the Audit/Review Phase 611 <p>Conducting compliance reviews 611 <p>Conducting security reviews 612 <p>Summary 612 <p>Exercises 613 <p>Chapter 23: Understanding Advanced Linux Security 615 <p>Implementing Linux Security with Cryptography 615 <p>Understanding hashing 616 <p>Understanding encryption/decryption 618 <p>Understanding cryptographic ciphers 618 <p>Understanding cryptographic cipher keys 619 <p>Understanding digital signatures 625 <p>Implementing Linux cryptography 627 <p>Ensuring file integrity 627 <p>Encrypting a Linux filesystem 628 <p>Encrypting a Linux directory 630 <p>Encrypting a Linux file 633 <p>Encrypting Linux miscellaneous 634 <p>Implementing Linux Security with PAM 635 <p>Understanding the PAM authentication process 636 <p>Understanding PAM contexts 638 <p>Understanding PAM control flags 638 <p>Understanding PAM modules 639 <p>Understanding PAM system event configuration files 640 <p>Administering PAM on your Linux system 641 <p>Managing PAM-aware application configuration files 641 <p>Managing PAM system event confi guration files 642 <p>Implementing resources limits with PAM 644 <p>Implementing time restrictions with PAM 646 <p>Encouraging sudo use with PAM 652 <p>Locking accounts with PAM 653 <p>Obtaining more information on PAM 655 <p>Summary 656 <p>Exercises 656 <p>Chapter 24: Enhancing Linux Security with SELinux 659 <p>Understanding SELinux Benefits 659 <p>Understanding How SELinux Works 661 <p>Understanding Type Enforcement 661 <p>Understanding Multi-Level Security 662 <p>Implementing SELinux security models 663 <p>Understanding SELinux Operational Modes 663 <p>Understanding SELinux security contexts 664 <p>Understanding SELinux Policy types 667 <p>Understanding SELinux Policy rule packages 668 <p>Configuring SELinux 669 <p>Setting the SELinux Operational Mode 670 <p>Setting the SELinux Policy type 672 <p>Managing SELinux security contexts 673 <p>Managing the user security context 674 <p>Managing the file security context 675 <p>Managing the process security context 676 <p>Managing SELinux policy rule packages 676 <p>Managing SELinux via Booleans 678 <p>Monitoring and Troubleshooting SELinux 679 <p>Understanding SELinux logging 679 <p>Reviewing SELinux messages in the audit log 680 <p>Reviewing SELinux messages in the messages log 680 <p>Troubleshooting SELinux logging 682 <p>Troubleshooting common SELinux problems 682 <p>Using a non-standard directory for a service 683 <p>Using a non-standard port for a service 683 <p>Moving files and losing security context labels 684 <p>Booleans set incorrectly 684 <p>Putting It All Together 684 <p>Obtaining More Information on SELinux 685 <p>Summary 686 <p>Exercises 686 <p>Chapter 25: Securing Linux on a Network 689 <p>Auditing Network Services 690 <p>Evaluating access to network services 692 <p>Using nmap to create a network services list 692 <p>Using nmap to audit your network services advertisements 695 <p>Controlling access to network services 699 <p>Working with Firewalls 702 <p>Understanding firewalls 702 <p>Implementing firewalls 703 <p>Understanding the iptables utility 703 <p>Using the iptables utility 707 <p>Summary 715 <p>Exercises 716 <p>Part VI: Appendixes 717 <p>Appendix A: Media 719 <p>Getting Fedora 720 <p>Getting Red Hat Enterprise Linux 721 <p>Getting Ubuntu 722 <p>Creating Linux CDs and DVDs 724 <p>Burning CDs/DVDs in Windows 724 <p>Burning CDs/DVDs on a Mac OS X system 724 <p>Burning CDs/DVDs in Linux 725 <p>Burning CDs from a Linux desktop 725 <p>Burning CDs from a Linux command line 726 <p>Booting Linux from a USB Drive 727 <p>Appendix B: Exercise Answers 729 <p>Chapter 2: Creating the Perfect Linux Desktop 729 <p>Chapter 3: Using the Shell 732 <p>Chapter 4: Moving Around the Filesystem 734 <p>Chapter 5: Working with Text Files 735 <p>Chapter 6: Managing Running Processes 737 <p>Chapter 7: Writing Simple Shell Scripts 738 <p>Chapter 8: Learning System Administration 740 <p>Chapter 9: Installing Linux 743 <p>Chapter 10: Getting and Managing Software 745 <p>Chapter 11: Managing User Accounts 746 <p>Chapter 12: Managing Disks and Filesystems 750 <p>Chapter 13: Understanding Server Administration 752 <p>Chapter 14: Administering Networking 755 <p>Chapter 15: Starting and Stopping Services 758 <p>Chapter 16: Configuring a Print Server 761 <p>Chapter 17: Configuring a Web Server 763 <p>Chapter 18: Configuring an FTP Server 766 <p>Chapter 19: Configuring a Windows File Sharing (Samba) Server 769 <p>Chapter 20: Configuring an NFS File Server 772 <p>Chapter 21: Troubleshooting Linux 774 <p>Chapter 22: Understanding Basic Linux Security 776 <p>Chapter 23: Understanding Advanced Linux Security 777 <p>Chapter 24: Enhancing Linux Security with SELinux 779 <p>Chapter 25: Securing Linux on a Network 781 <p>Index 783
Responsibility: written by Christopher Negus ; with contributions by Christine Bresnahan.

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   schema:genre "Electronic books"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "Linux bible : the comprehensive, tutorial resource : build Linux desktop and server skills : advance to enterprise-level computing : become a Linux system admin or power user"@en ;
   schema:productID "824773748" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/824773748#PublicationEvent/indianapolis_ind_john_wiley_&_sons_2012> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4417630930#Agent/john_wiley_&_sons> ; # John Wiley & Sons
   schema:url <http://proquest.tech.safaribooksonline.de/9781118282878> ;
   schema:url <http://proquest.safaribooksonline.com/9781118282878> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/824773748> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4417630930#Agent/john_wiley_&_sons> # John Wiley & Sons
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "John Wiley & Sons" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4417630930#Place/indianapolis_ind> # Indianapolis, Ind.
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "Indianapolis, Ind." ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1046280> # Operating systems (Computers)
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Operating systems (Computers)"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1382136> # Linux.
    a schema:CreativeWork ;
   schema:name "Linux." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/114373066> # Chris Negus
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:birthDate "1957" ;
   schema:familyName "Negus" ;
   schema:givenName "Chris" ;
   schema:name "Chris Negus" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/190471202> # Christine Bresnahan
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Bresnahan" ;
   schema:givenName "Christine" ;
   schema:name "Christine Bresnahan" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/824773748>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
   schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/824773748> ; # Linux bible : the comprehensive, tutorial resource : build Linux desktop and server skills : advance to enterprise-level computing : become a Linux system admin or power user
   schema:dateModified "2017-12-23" ;
   void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

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