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The lion and the fox.

Author: Wyndham Lewis
Publisher: Barnes & Noble [1966, 1927]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; Niccolò Machiavelli; Niccolò Machiavelli; William Shakespeare
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Wyndham Lewis
OCLC Number: 353838
Description: 326 pages
Contents: Part I: Tudor England and Renaissance Italy --
The national situation of England under Elizabeth --
The empire --
Politics and the Elizabethan stage --
Italy and Europe --
Part II: Machiavelli --
The opposite experiences of Poggio and the English Milord --
Machiavelli in Elizabethan drama --
Machiavelli and the reformation --
The quality of Machiavelli's candour --
"Periods of transition" --
The individual hero or prince, and the Ottimati, for Machiavelli and Guicciardini --
Machiavelli, Georges Sorel and Nietzsche --
Frederick the Great --
Some consequences of Machiavellism --
The lady's response to Machiavelli --
Part III: Shakespeare and the king or hero --
The reason of the choice of the eminent for the purposes of tragedy --
The figure of the king --
The rôle of the jester or "vituperator," and the divinity "hedging" a king --
Singularity and responsibility --
Shakespeare as executioner --
Part IV: Shakespeare and the agent-principle --
Shakespeare a feminine genius --
Shakespeare's infatuation for Antony --
Shakespeare's work as "a criticism of action" --
The world of action and the world of tragedy --
Shakespeare as a showman --
Part V: The colossi of the third period --
Shakespeare's nihilism --
The manufacture of a Shakespearean colossus --
The "man of the world" --
Othello as the typical colossus --
Part VI: The two knights --
The contest of the lion and the fox in Shakespeare and Cervantes --
The form responsible for the mind --
Falstaff and Don Quixote --
Falstaff --
Part VII: Thersites and Apemantus --
Dr Bowdler and the Elizabethan mind --
Coriolanus and aristocratism --
Apemantus and Timon --
Thersites and the heroes of the Homeric saga --
Part VIII: Renan's Caliban and Chapman's Duke of Byron --
Resemblances in the political and ethical canons of Shakespeare and Chapman --
Renan's Caliban --
Some concluding observations --
Part IX: appendix: Shakespeare and race --
Race and the person --
The depersonalization of Shakespeare --
The "creeping Saxon" and the "Celt" --
Chivalry --
The plain unvarnished Celt --
Arnold's little farce, now for the first time rescued from its ironical setting for the English-speaking public.

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Linked Data


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