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The literary remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Henry Nelson Coleridge
Publisher: New York : AMS Press, 1967.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 1772-1834.
Literary remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
New York : AMS Press, 1967
(OCoLC)654170914
Named Person: William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Henry Nelson Coleridge
OCLC Number: 357851
Description: 4 volumes ; 23 cm
Contents: v. 1. The fall of Robespierre --
Poems --
"Julia was blest with beauty, wit, and grace" --
" ... I yet remain" --
To the Rev. W.J. Hort --
To Charles Lamb --
To the nightingale --
To Sara --
To Joseph Cottle --
Casimir --
Darwiniana --
"The early year's fast-flying vapours stray" --
Count Rumford's essays --
Epigrams --
On a late marriage between an old maid and a French Petit Maitre --
On an amorous doctor --
"There comes from Avaro's grave" --
"Last Monday all the papers said" --
To a primrose, (the first seen in the season) --
On the christening of a friend's child --
Epigram, "Hoarse Maevius reads his hobbling verse" --
Inscription by the Rev. W.L. Bowles, in Nether Stowey Church --
Translation --
Introduction to the tale of the dark ladie --
Epilogue to the rash conjuror --
Psyche --
Complaint --
Reproof --
An ode to the rain --
Translation of a passage in Ottfried's metrical paraphrase of the Gospels --
Israel's lament on the death of the Princess Charlotte of Wales --
Sentimental --
The alternative --
The exchange --
What is life? --
Inscription for a time-piece --
A course of lectures --
Prospectus --
General character of the Gothic mind in the Middle Ages --
General character of the Gothic literature and art --
The troubadours, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Pulci, Chaucer, Spenser --
Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and Massinger --
Don Quixote. Cervantes --
On the distinctions of the witty, the droll, the odd, and the humorous ; the nature and constituents of humour ; Rabelais, Swift, Sterne --
Donne, Dante, Milton, Paradise Lost --
Asiatic and Greek mythologies, Robinson Crusoe, use of works of imagination in education --
Dreams, apparitions, alchemists, personality of the evil being, bodily identity --
On poesy or art --
On style --
Notes on Sir Thomas Browne's Religio Medici --
Notes on Junius --
Notes on Barclay's Argenis --
Note on Casaubon's Persius --
Notes on Chapman's Homer --
Note in Baxter's life of himself --
Fragment of an essay on taste --
Fragment of an essay on beauty --
Poems and poetical fragments --
Omniana --
The French decade --
Ride and tie --
Jeremy Taylor --
Criticism --
Public instruction --
Picturesque words --
Toleration --
War --
Parodies --
M. Dupuis --
Origin of the worship of Hymen --
Egotism --
Cap of liberty --
Bulls --
Wise ignorance --
Rouge --
Hasty words --
Motives and impulses --
Inward blindness --
The vices of slaves no excuse for slavery --
Circulation of the blood --
Periturae Parcere Chartae --
To have and to be --
Party passion --
Goodness of heart indispensable to a man of genius --
Milton and Ben Jonson --
Statistics --
Magnanimity --
Negroes and narcissuses --
An anecdote --
The Pharos at Alexandria --
Sense and common sense --
Toleration --
Hint for a new species of history --
Text sparring --
Pelagianism --
The soul and its organs of sense --
Sir George Etherege, &c. --
Evidence --
Force of habit --
Phoenix --
Memory and recollection --
Aliquid ex Nihilo --
Brevity of the Greek and English compared --
The will and the deed --
The will for the deed --
Sincerity --
Truth and falsehood --
Religious ceremonies --
Association --
Curiosity --
New truths --
Vicious pleasures --
Meriting heaven --
Dust to dust --
Human countenance --
Lie useful to truth --
Science in Roman Catholic states --
Voluntary belief --
Amanda --
Hymen's torch --
Youth and age --
December morning --
Archbishop Leighton --
Christian honesty --
Inscription on a clock in Cheapside --
Rationalism is not reason --
Inconsistency --
Hope in humanity --
Self-love in religion --
Limitation of love of poetry --
Humility of the amiable --
Temper in argument --
Patriarchal government --
Callous self-conceit --
A librarian --
Trimming --
Death --
Love an act of the will --
Wedded union --
Difference between Hobbes and Spinosa --
The end may justify the means --
Negative thought --
Man's return to heaven --
Young prodigies --
Welch names --
German language --
The universe --
Harberous --
An admonition --
To thee Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry --
Definition of miracle --
Death, and grounds of belief in a future state --
Hatred of injustice --
Religion --
The Apostles' Creed --
A good heart --
Evidences of Christianity --
Confessio Fidei. v. 2. Extract from a letter written by Mr. Coleridge, in February, 1818, to a gentleman who attended the course of lectures given in the spring of that year --
Extract from a letter to J. Britton, Esq. --
Shakspeare, with introductory matter on poetry, the drama, and the stage --
Definition of poetry --
Greek drama --
Progress of the drama --
The drama generally, and public taste --
Shakspeare, a poet generally --
Shakspeare's judgment equal to his genius --
Recapitulation, and summary of the characteristics of Shakspeare's dramas --
Order of Shakspeare's plays --
Notes on The tempest --
Love's labour's lost --
Midsummer night's dream --
Comedy of errors --
As you like it --
Twelfth night --
All's well that ends well --
Merry wives of Windsor --
Measure for measure --
Cymbeline --
Titus Andronicus --
Troilus and Cressida --
Coriolanus --
Julius Caesar --
Antony and Cleopatra --
Timon of Athens --
Romeo and Juliet --
Shakspeare's English historical plays --
King John --
Henry IV. Part I --
Henry IV. Part II --
Henry V --
Henry VI. Part I --
Richard III --
Lear --
Hamlet --
Notes on Macbeth --
Notes on the Winter's tale --
Notes on Othello --
Notes on Ben Jonson --
Whalley's preface --
Whalley's life of Jonson --
Every man out of his humour --
Poetaster --
Fall of Sejanus --
Volpone --
Epicaene --
The alchemist --
Catiline's conspiracy --
Bartholomew Fair --
The devil is an ass --
The staple of news --
The new inn --
Notes on Beaumont and Fletcher --
Harris's commendatory poem on Fletcher --
Life of Fletcher in Stockdale's edition. 1811 --
Maid's tragedy --
A king and no king --
The scornful lady --
The custom of the country --
The elder brother --
The Spanish curate --
Wit without money --
The humorous lieutenant --
The mad lover --
The loyal subject --
Rule a wife and have a wife --
The laws of candy --
The little French lawyer --
Valentinian --
Rollo --
The wildgoose chase --
A wife for a month --
The pilgrim --
The Queen of Corinth --
The noble gentleman --
The coronation --
Wit at several weapons --
The fair maid of the inn --
The two noble kinsmen --
The woman hater --
On the Prometheus of Aeschylus --
Note on Chalmer's Life of Daniel --
Bishop Corbet --
Notes on Selden's Table Talk --
Note on theological lectures of Benjamin Wheeler, D.D. --
Note on a sermon on the prevalence of infidelity and enthusiasm, by Walter Birch, B.D. --
Fenelon on charity --
Change of the climates --
Wonderfulness of prose --
Notes on Tom Jones --
Jonathan Wild --
Barry Cornwall --
The primitive Christian's address to the cross --
Fuller's holy state --
Fuller's profane state --
Fuller's appeal of injured innocence --
Fuller's church history --
Asgill's argument --
Introduction to Asgill's defence upon his expulsion from the House of Commons --
Notes on Sir Thomas Browne's Religio Medici --
Notes on Sir Thomas Browne's Garden of Cyrus --
Notes on Sir Thomas Browne's Vulgar errors. v. 3. Formula Fidei de SS. Trinitate --
Nightly prayer --
Notes on the Book of common prayer --
Notes on Hooker --
Notes on Field --
Notes on Donne --
Notes on Henry More --
Notes on Heinrichs --
Notes on Hacket --
Notes on Jeremy Taylor --
Notes on The pilgrim's progress --
Notes on John Smith --
Letter to a godchild. v. 4. Notes on Luther --
Notes on St. Theresa --
Notes on Bedell --
Notes on Baxter --
Notes on Leighton --
Notes on Sherlock --
Notes on Waterland --
Notes on Skelton --
Notes on Andrew Fuller --
Notes on Whitaker --
Notes on Oxlee --
Notes on A barrister's hints --
Notes on Davison --
Notes on Irving --
Notes on Noble --
Essay on faith.
Responsibility: collected and edited by Henry Nelson Coleridge.

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schema:description"v. 1. The fall of Robespierre -- Poems -- "Julia was blest with beauty, wit, and grace" -- " ... I yet remain" -- To the Rev. W.J. Hort -- To Charles Lamb -- To the nightingale -- To Sara -- To Joseph Cottle -- Casimir -- Darwiniana -- "The early year's fast-flying vapours stray" -- Count Rumford's essays -- Epigrams -- On a late marriage between an old maid and a French Petit Maitre -- On an amorous doctor -- "There comes from Avaro's grave" -- "Last Monday all the papers said" -- To a primrose, (the first seen in the season) -- On the christening of a friend's child -- Epigram, "Hoarse Maevius reads his hobbling verse" -- Inscription by the Rev. W.L. Bowles, in Nether Stowey Church -- Translation -- Introduction to the tale of the dark ladie -- Epilogue to the rash conjuror -- Psyche -- Complaint -- Reproof -- An ode to the rain -- Translation of a passage in Ottfried's metrical paraphrase of the Gospels -- Israel's lament on the death of the Princess Charlotte of Wales -- Sentimental -- The alternative -- The exchange -- What is life? -- Inscription for a time-piece -- A course of lectures -- Prospectus -- General character of the Gothic mind in the Middle Ages -- General character of the Gothic literature and art -- The troubadours, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Pulci, Chaucer, Spenser -- Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and Massinger -- Don Quixote. Cervantes -- On the distinctions of the witty, the droll, the odd, and the humorous ; the nature and constituents of humour ; Rabelais, Swift, Sterne -- Donne, Dante, Milton, Paradise Lost -- Asiatic and Greek mythologies, Robinson Crusoe, use of works of imagination in education -- Dreams, apparitions, alchemists, personality of the evil being, bodily identity -- On poesy or art -- On style -- Notes on Sir Thomas Browne's Religio Medici -- Notes on Junius -- Notes on Barclay's Argenis -- Note on Casaubon's Persius -- Notes on Chapman's Homer -- Note in Baxter's life of himself -- Fragment of an essay on taste -- Fragment of an essay on beauty -- Poems and poetical fragments -- Omniana -- The French decade -- Ride and tie -- Jeremy Taylor -- Criticism -- Public instruction -- Picturesque words -- Toleration -- War -- Parodies -- M. Dupuis -- Origin of the worship of Hymen -- Egotism -- Cap of liberty -- Bulls -- Wise ignorance -- Rouge -- Hasty words -- Motives and impulses -- Inward blindness -- The vices of slaves no excuse for slavery -- Circulation of the blood -- Periturae Parcere Chartae -- To have and to be -- Party passion -- Goodness of heart indispensable to a man of genius -- Milton and Ben Jonson -- Statistics -- Magnanimity -- Negroes and narcissuses -- An anecdote -- The Pharos at Alexandria -- Sense and common sense -- Toleration -- Hint for a new species of history -- Text sparring -- Pelagianism -- The soul and its organs of sense -- Sir George Etherege, &c. -- Evidence -- Force of habit -- Phoenix -- Memory and recollection -- Aliquid ex Nihilo -- Brevity of the Greek and English compared -- The will and the deed -- The will for the deed -- Sincerity -- Truth and falsehood -- Religious ceremonies -- Association -- Curiosity -- New truths -- Vicious pleasures -- Meriting heaven -- Dust to dust -- Human countenance -- Lie useful to truth -- Science in Roman Catholic states -- Voluntary belief -- Amanda -- Hymen's torch -- Youth and age -- December morning -- Archbishop Leighton -- Christian honesty -- Inscription on a clock in Cheapside -- Rationalism is not reason -- Inconsistency -- Hope in humanity -- Self-love in religion -- Limitation of love of poetry -- Humility of the amiable -- Temper in argument -- Patriarchal government -- Callous self-conceit -- A librarian -- Trimming -- Death -- Love an act of the will -- Wedded union -- Difference between Hobbes and Spinosa -- The end may justify the means -- Negative thought -- Man's return to heaven -- Young prodigies -- Welch names -- German language -- The universe -- Harberous -- An admonition -- To thee Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry -- Definition of miracle -- Death, and grounds of belief in a future state -- Hatred of injustice -- Religion -- The Apostles' Creed -- A good heart -- Evidences of Christianity -- Confessio Fidei."@en
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schema:description"v. 3. Formula Fidei de SS. Trinitate -- Nightly prayer -- Notes on the Book of common prayer -- Notes on Hooker -- Notes on Field -- Notes on Donne -- Notes on Henry More -- Notes on Heinrichs -- Notes on Hacket -- Notes on Jeremy Taylor -- Notes on The pilgrim's progress -- Notes on John Smith -- Letter to a godchild."@en
schema:description"v. 4. Notes on Luther -- Notes on St. Theresa -- Notes on Bedell -- Notes on Baxter -- Notes on Leighton -- Notes on Sherlock -- Notes on Waterland -- Notes on Skelton -- Notes on Andrew Fuller -- Notes on Whitaker -- Notes on Oxlee -- Notes on A barrister's hints -- Notes on Davison -- Notes on Irving -- Notes on Noble -- Essay on faith."@en
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