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Literary remains : representations of death and burial in Victorian England

Author: Mary Elizabeth Hotz
Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2009.
Series: SUNY series, studies in the long nineteenth century.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Literary Remains explores the unexpectedly central role of death and burial in Victorian England. Locating corpses at the center of an extensive range of concerns, including money and law, medicine and urban architecture, social planning and folklore, religion and national identity, Mary Elizabeth Hotz draws on a range of legal, administrative, journalistic, and literary writing to offer a thoughtful meditation on  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mary Elizabeth Hotz
ISBN: 9780791476598 0791476596 9780791476604 079147660X
OCLC Number: 191697373
Description: xi, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: disinterring death --
Down among the dead: Edwin Chadwick's burial reform discourse in mid-nineteenth-century England --
Taught by death what life should be: representations of death in Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and North and South --
To profit us when he was dead: dead-body politics in our mutual friend --
Death eclipsed: the contested churchyard in Thomas Hardy's novels --
The tonic of fire: cremation in late Victorian England --
Conclusion: Dracula's last word.
Series Title: SUNY series, studies in the long nineteenth century.
Responsibility: Mary Elizabeth Hotz.
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Abstract:

"Literary Remains explores the unexpectedly central role of death and burial in Victorian England. Locating corpses at the center of an extensive range of concerns, including money and law, medicine and urban architecture, social planning and folklore, religion and national identity, Mary Elizabeth Hotz draws on a range of legal, administrative, journalistic, and literary writing to offer a thoughtful meditation on Victorian attitudes toward death and burial, as well as how those attitudes influenced present-day death-way practices. Literary Remains gives new meaning to the phrase that serves as its significant theme: "Taught by death what life should be.""--Jacket.

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