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Locating for potential : an empirical study of Company X's innovation centre in Vancouver, British Columbia

Author: Richard Florida; Kathrine Richardson; Kevin Stolarick; Martin Prosperity Institute.; Joseph L. Rotman School of Management.
Publisher: Toronto, Ont. : Martin Prosperity Institute, 2009
Series: Ontario in the creative age.; Working paper series.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The greater Vancouver, B.C. region has long been seen as an outpost to a staples economy (Innis 1999; Hutton 1997; Barnes 1996) and a gateway to the Asia Pacific for over one hundred years (Edgington and Goldberg 1992; Hutton 1998). However, over the past two years a leading US based high technology firm, referred to as "Company X", established a key innovation centre in Vancouver. Clearly, it is a very exciting
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Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Florida; Kathrine Richardson; Kevin Stolarick; Martin Prosperity Institute.; Joseph L. Rotman School of Management.
OCLC Number: 549255092
Notes: "October 2009."
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: 1. Introduction --
2. Concepts and theories --
Location theory in general --
The location of talent --Talent and regional growth --
The role of diversity --
3. Research and methods --
4. Findings --
Openness to global talent --
Proximity matters --
Leveraging the west coast lifestyle --
The multiculturalism advantage --
5. Discussion --
6. Conclusion --
References --
Table 1. Canadian temporary and permanent entry statuses.
Series Title: Ontario in the creative age.; Working paper series.
Responsibility: prepared by Richard Florida, Kathrine Richardson, Kevin Stolarick ; Martin Prosperity Institute ; Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
More information:

Abstract:

The greater Vancouver, B.C. region has long been seen as an outpost to a staples economy (Innis 1999; Hutton 1997; Barnes 1996) and a gateway to the Asia Pacific for over one hundred years (Edgington and Goldberg 1992; Hutton 1998). However, over the past two years a leading US based high technology firm, referred to as "Company X", established a key innovation centre in Vancouver. Clearly, it is a very exciting time for the Vancouver region as it makes this transition from being a "timber town" towards becoming a creative hotbed of global talent (the international creative class) and being seen as a possible leader in new ideas that propels the global software industry forward. Thus, at this time, it is important to take a closer and more in-depth look at the reason for Company X's initial reasons for choosing Vancouver over other comparable locations, whether regionally, nationally, and/or globally when it came to selecting a site that would allow it to gain access to potential pools of highly skilled labour not living in the immediate vicinity of the Vancouver region. Geographers have paid considerable attention to firm location decisions when it comes to access to human capital over the past 80 years. These approaches range from neoclassical location theory, to the works of Jane Jacobs and Ullman (1958) who both stress the importance of existing talent contributing to regional development.

More recently, Glaser (2000) emphasizes the importance of common pools of talent, which allow firms to cluster together in regional agglomerations, as opposed to inter-firm linkages. Finally, Gottlieb (1994; 1995) stresses that high tech firms choose locations based on residential and lifestyle amenities. However, none of this existing literature explores the location choice process and preferences for a world-class firm seeking potential talent and labour not yet realized. Therefore, this presentation will advance the main hypothesis that the economic geography of a high technology firm will be attracted to a region that enables and facilitates low barriers of entry for potential global talent. It will also build on the existing literature, which explores the factors that attract talent and shape its economic geography. As well, in light of providing a locational decision for potential talent, the notion of jurisdictional advantage (Feldman and Martin 2005) will be used in order to provide the theoretical foundation needed to set the stage for the creation of the development of a new location theory called "Potencia."

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