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Locke : a biography

Author: R S Woolhouse
Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This is the first comprehensive biography in half a century of John Locke. Against a historical background of the English Civil War, religious intolerance and bigotry, anti-Government struggles and plots, and the Glorious Revolution of 1688, Roger Woolhouse interweaves the events of Locke's rather varied life with detailed expositions of his developing ideas in medicine, theory of knowledge, philosophy of science,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: John Locke; John Locke; John Locke; John Locke
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: R S Woolhouse
ISBN: 9780521817868 0521817862
OCLC Number: 71243859
Description: xviii, 528 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Contents: Introduction : "a man of versatile mind" --
1. Upbringing and education (1632-1658) --
1632-1646 : "I found myself in a storm" (Somerset childhood) --
1646-1652 : "a very severe school" (Westminster School) --
1652-1656 : "no very hard student" (Oxford B.A. studies) --
1656-1658 : "a most learned and ingenious young man" (Oxford M.A. studies) --
2. College offices and medical studies (1659-1667) --
January-December 1659 : "melancholy and discontented" (away from friends) --
January-December 1659 : "study in earnest" (medicine ; toleration) --
January-October 1660 : "I shall not willingly be drawn from hence" (medicine ; anxieties about political situation) --
October-December 1660 : "whether the civil magistrate may lawfully impose" (law of nature ; "first tract on government") --
December 1660-December 1662 : "quiet and settlement" (father's death ; college tutor, and lecturer in Greek ; "infallibility" ; lecturer in rhetoric ; "second tract on government") --
January 1663-November 1665 : "no law without a law-maker" (chemistry ; ecclesiastical offers ; "essays on the law of nature" ; respiration and blood) --
November 1665-February 1666 : "took coach for Germany" (diplomacy in Cleves) --
February-July 1666 : natural philosophy : practical and theoretical (iatrochemical preparations ; barometrical observations ; Respirationis Usus) --
3. Exeter House, London (1666-1675) : "one accident in my life" --
July 1666-May 1667 : "falling into a great man's family" (Ashley Cooper ; dispensation from holy orders ; offer of preferment ; Elinor Parry ; "Morbus" ; iatrochemistry) --
June-December 1667 : "with my Lord Ashley as a man at home" (Exeter House ; Sydenham : "essay concerning toleration") --
January-December 1668 : "turning his thoughts another way" (Ashley's operation ; "Anatomie" ; interest rates) --
January 1669-December 1670 : "a love of all sorts of useful knowledge" (Elinor Parry ; "Constitutions of Carolina" ; match-making ; De arte medica ; ill-health) --
January-September 1671 : "what I think about the human understanding" (Anthony Ashley Cooper the third ; De Intellectu humano) --
September-December 1671 : "profitable to the life of man" (De intellectu, a second draft ; Royal Society) --
January 1672-November 1675 ; "that tether which certainly ties us" (peerage for Ashley ; colonial investments ; short visit to France ; Secretary of Presentations ; Secretary and Treasurer of Council of Trade ; interest rates ; an annuity ; Bachelor of Medicine ; license to practise ; medical studentship) --
4. France (November 1675-May 1679) --
November 1675-January 1676 : Paris to Montpellier --
January 1676-March 1677 : Montpellier --
March 1677-July 1678 : Paris --
July-October 1678 : an extended "little tour" of France --
November 1678-May 1679 : Paris --
5. Thanet House and London (May 1679-September 1683) --
May-December 1679 : "things in such confusion" (Shaftesbury as Lord President ; popish plot ; standardisation of length ; correspondence with Toinard) --
December 1679-April 1680 : "a condition as might make your friends apprehensive" ("observations upon the growth and culture of vines") --
April-November 1680 : "fortune continues to cross all my plans" (Exclusion Bill ; correspondence with Toinard) --
November 1680-March 1681 : "1641 is come again" (The unreasonableness of separation ; Oxford Parliament) --
April 1681-April 1683 : "not a word ever drops from his mouth" (the King clamps down ; Shaftesbury arrested ; College's trial ; Damaris Cudworth ; Edward Clarke ; Shaftesbury dies) --
Two treatises of government --
April-September 1683 : "the times growing now troublesome" (Rye House plot : secretive movements ; hastily to Holland) --
6. Holland and the United Provinces (1683-1688) --
September 1683-October 1684 : "much in my chamber alone" (medical friends ; Limborch ; indexing notes ; tour of the provinces ; Labadists ; educational "directions") --
November-December 1684 : "suspected to be ill-affected" (expulsion from studentship) --
December 1684-September 1685 : "to be seized and banished" (under suspicion ; Monmouth's rebellion ; in hiding) --
September 1685 : "what God has though fit" ("de Intellectu" (draft C), book one (innate ideas) ; book two (origin of ideas) ; promise of pardon ; still suspected) --
September 1685-September 1686 : "that faith which works, not by force, but by love" (Epistola de Tolerantia ; "method of commonplacing" ; more thoughts on education ; no longer listed ; Yonges' visit ; Thomas visits) --
September-December 1686 : "changing one's abode is inconvenient" ("de Intellectu" , books three (words), and four (knowledge)) --
December 1686-March 1688 : "busy as a hen with one chick" (continued concern for safety ; Furly ; van Helmont ; ill ; rumours of pardon ; the Essay abridged) --
March 1688-January 1689 : "an expected invasion" (Thomas visits ; Stringer and a portrait ; Clarke visits ; William of Orange goes over ; return to England) --
7. London (February 1689-December 1690) --
February-December 1689 : annus mirabilis (offers of public position ; Epistola ; Commissioner of Appeals ; petition for studentship ; another quarrel with Stringer ; Letter concerning toleration ; Two treatises ; Essay concerning human understanding ; Newton) --
January-September 1690 : disputes and disagreements (Tyrrell and the Essay ; anonymity and acrimony ; "a call to the nation for unity" ; Proast and "a second letter concerning toleration") --
July-December 1690 : questions of economics (interest rates ; clipped coins ; plans to go to Holland) --
8. Oates (January 1691-December 1695) --
January-December 1691 : "the seraglio at Oates" (removal to Oates ; a return to natural philosophy? ; Bath and Somerset ; Some considerations of...money ; "multiplying gold" ; Aesop's fables) --
January-December 1692 : "you won't be well if you stay in town" (overseeing Edward Clarke ; Newton and transmutation ; Third letter concerning toleration ; William Molyneux ; Boyle's History of the air ; petition for Council of Trade salary ; a "dry club" ; disagreement with Norris ; "answer to Mr. Norris" ; liberty of will) --
January-December 1693 : "it were better if you were dead" (petition to Treasury : "short observations on...coining silver money" ; preparation for second edition of Essay ; Malebranche and "seeing all things in God" ; personal identity ; Some thoughts concerning education ; liberty of the will again) --
January-December 1694 : "discourse on matters of importance" (van Helmont visits ; Essay, second edition ; Thomas dies ; Bank of England ; a financial consultant ; the "college") --
January 1695 : "wherein the Christian faith consists" (The reasonableness of Christianity : natural law and revelation) --
January-August 1695 : "not one word of socinianism" (Licensing Act ; the Essay abridged ; recoinage recommended ; a water drinker ; Greenwich Hospital ; Edwards and socinianism ; Reasonableness of Christianity vindicated) --
August-December 1695 : "of great use to your country" (further currency considerations ; a Latin translator for the Essay) --
9. "A gentleman's duty" (December 1695-March 1700) --
December 1695-November 1696 : "your country calls for your help" (Commissioner for Trade ; recoinage ; Leibniz) --
November 1696-February 1697 : "a clipped Christianity" (controversy with Stillingfleet : Second vindication of the reasonableness of Christianity ; Samuel Bold) --
February 1697-January 1698 : "told I must prepare myself for a storm" (reply to Stillingfleet's answer to his Letter ; "conduct of the understanding" ; answer to Burnet ; Pierre Coste ; linen manufacture ; employment of the poor ; Edwards's Brief vindication) --
January-July 1698 : "at the jaws of death" (reply to Stillingfleet's answer to his Second letter ; Hudde and the uniqueness of God) --
July-December 1698 : "nothing ever escapes you" (meeting with Molyneux ; meeting with Bold ; Peter King ; "elements of natural philosophy") --
January 1699-March 1700 : "a too long stay in town" ("Association of Ideas" ; "enthusiasm") --
10. "Laying down his place" (March 1700-October 1704) --
March 1700-March 1701 : "nothing but what I ought and do expect" (retirement from Board of Trade ; bad legs ; the question of liberty) --
March 1701-December 1702 : "the ornament of this age" (deafness ; Catherine Trotter ; "directions for reading" ; "miracles") --
January-December 1703 : "new life" (Anthony Collins ; Aesop's fables ; St. Paul's Epistles) --
January-August 1704 : "at the end of my day when my sun is setting" (Oxford book ban ; a new carriage ; St. Paul's Epistles) --
August-October 1704 : "a happy life, but nothing but vanity" (A Fourth letter for toleration ; King's marriage ; death).
Responsibility: Roger Woolhouse.
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Abstract:

This is the first comprehensive biography of John Locke to be published in nearly a half century.  Read more...

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'If one loves Locke, or liberty, or, indeed, Somerset, this is a book one cannot comfortably live without. Roger Woolhouse is a professor of philosophy, so he can explain the full development of Read more...

 
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schema:description"7. London (February 1689-December 1690) -- February-December 1689 : annus mirabilis (offers of public position ; Epistola ; Commissioner of Appeals ; petition for studentship ; another quarrel with Stringer ; Letter concerning toleration ; Two treatises ; Essay concerning human understanding ; Newton) -- January-September 1690 : disputes and disagreements (Tyrrell and the Essay ; anonymity and acrimony ; "a call to the nation for unity" ; Proast and "a second letter concerning toleration") -- July-December 1690 : questions of economics (interest rates ; clipped coins ; plans to go to Holland) -- 8. Oates (January 1691-December 1695) -- January-December 1691 : "the seraglio at Oates" (removal to Oates ; a return to natural philosophy? ; Bath and Somerset ; Some considerations of...money ; "multiplying gold" ; Aesop's fables) -- January-December 1692 : "you won't be well if you stay in town" (overseeing Edward Clarke ; Newton and transmutation ; Third letter concerning toleration ; William Molyneux ; Boyle's History of the air ; petition for Council of Trade salary ; a "dry club" ; disagreement with Norris ; "answer to Mr. Norris" ; liberty of will) -- January-December 1693 : "it were better if you were dead" (petition to Treasury : "short observations on...coining silver money" ; preparation for second edition of Essay ; Malebranche and "seeing all things in God" ; personal identity ; Some thoughts concerning education ; liberty of the will again) -- January-December 1694 : "discourse on matters of importance" (van Helmont visits ; Essay, second edition ; Thomas dies ; Bank of England ; a financial consultant ; the "college") -- January 1695 : "wherein the Christian faith consists" (The reasonableness of Christianity : natural law and revelation) -- January-August 1695 : "not one word of socinianism" (Licensing Act ; the Essay abridged ; recoinage recommended ; a water drinker ; Greenwich Hospital ; Edwards and socinianism ; Reasonableness of Christianity vindicated) -- August-December 1695 : "of great use to your country" (further currency considerations ; a Latin translator for the Essay) --"@en
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schema:description"9. "A gentleman's duty" (December 1695-March 1700) -- December 1695-November 1696 : "your country calls for your help" (Commissioner for Trade ; recoinage ; Leibniz) -- November 1696-February 1697 : "a clipped Christianity" (controversy with Stillingfleet : Second vindication of the reasonableness of Christianity ; Samuel Bold) -- February 1697-January 1698 : "told I must prepare myself for a storm" (reply to Stillingfleet's answer to his Letter ; "conduct of the understanding" ; answer to Burnet ; Pierre Coste ; linen manufacture ; employment of the poor ; Edwards's Brief vindication) -- January-July 1698 : "at the jaws of death" (reply to Stillingfleet's answer to his Second letter ; Hudde and the uniqueness of God) -- July-December 1698 : "nothing ever escapes you" (meeting with Molyneux ; meeting with Bold ; Peter King ; "elements of natural philosophy") -- January 1699-March 1700 : "a too long stay in town" ("Association of Ideas" ; "enthusiasm") -- 10. "Laying down his place" (March 1700-October 1704) -- March 1700-March 1701 : "nothing but what I ought and do expect" (retirement from Board of Trade ; bad legs ; the question of liberty) -- March 1701-December 1702 : "the ornament of this age" (deafness ; Catherine Trotter ; "directions for reading" ; "miracles") -- January-December 1703 : "new life" (Anthony Collins ; Aesop's fables ; St. Paul's Epistles) -- January-August 1704 : "at the end of my day when my sun is setting" (Oxford book ban ; a new carriage ; St. Paul's Epistles) -- August-October 1704 : "a happy life, but nothing but vanity" (A Fourth letter for toleration ; King's marriage ; death)."@en
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