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The long night of dark intent : a half century of Cuban communism

Author: Irving Louis Horowitz
Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Cuban Revolution did not start with the entrance of guerrillas into Havana on January 1, 1959. As Castro himself made clear, that event culminated several years of armed insurrection against the Batista regime. It was both a triumph and a harbinger of tragedy to come. Rather than herald a new Cuba joining the world's democracies, January 1, 1959 marked a new stage in authoritarian rule in the Americas. This  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Irving Louis Horowitz
ISBN: 9781412808798 1412808790 9781412808057 1412808057
OCLC Number: 215178011
Description: xxi, 599 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1960s: guerrilla dictatorship --
The Stalinization of Fidel Castro --
Castrologists and apologists: true belief in the service of false sentiment --
Cuban communism and Marxist revisionism --
The missile crisis: a decade in United States-Cuban relations --
1970s: consolidation of communism --
United States policy toward Cuba in a Latin context --
Capitalism, communism, and multinationalism --
The militarization of guerrilla communism --
Military origins of the Cuban revolution --
Ideological euphoria and post-revolutionary Cuba --
Authenticity and autonomy in Cuban communism --
Institutionalized militarism of Cuba --
The Cuba lobby: supplying rope to a mortgaged revolution --
Institutionalization as integration: the Cuban revolution at age twenty --
1980s: militarization of the regime --
C. Wright Mills and Listen, Yankee! --
The role of Cuba in the pacification of Central America --
Fidel's "soft" Stalinism --
1990s: regionalization and retreat --
Small nation, global pretensions: Fidel Castro redux --
Revolution, longevity, and legitimacy in communist states --
The dictator who would be king --
New beginnings and familiar endings --
Totalitarian options in a post-communist world --
American foreign policy toward Castro: paradox, procrastination, and paralysis --
The conscience of Castrologists --
Social science as an instrument of democratic struggle --
The Cuban revolution: the myth of theory and the theory of myths --
Consequences of the American embargo --
The Jewish experience in Cuba --
Castro and the end of ideology --
Military autonomy and dependency in Castro's Cuba --
Cuban models and democratic choices --
Endless celebrations for an old dictator --
Reality avoidance and political pilgrimage --
Three points of light: long term U.S. policy responses to Cuba --
Cuba lobby upgrade: plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose --
The Cuban embargo and the American interest --
2000s: dissolution of political power --
The two Cubas of Elián González --
Cuba after Castro: the historical limits to dictatorship --
Humanitarian capitulation --
One hundred years of ambiguity: U.S.-Cuba relations in the 20th century --
The conflict between economy and ideology in Cuban communism --
Transition scenarios for a post-Castro Cuba: speaking loudly but carrying a small stick --
Castro's corn: petroleum and globalization --
Rocky shoals of reform: Castro and the Caudillo --
Cuba, Castro, and anti-semitism --
Semper Fidel --
Mi vida: the Manichean face of dictatorship.
Responsibility: Irving Louis Horowitz.
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Abstract:

The Cuban Revolution did not start with the entrance of guerrillas into Havana on January 1, 1959. As Castro himself made clear, that event culminated several years of armed insurrection against  Read more...

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"The story of the Castro regime through the Salinization lens is not a pretty one. Horowitz's defense of his position necessarily involves detailed exposition of the violent, repressive side of the Read more...

 
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