skip to content
The long road to Annapolis : the founding of the Naval Academy and the emerging American republic Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The long road to Annapolis : the founding of the Naval Academy and the emerging American republic

Author: William P Leeman
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The United States established an academy for educating future army officers at West Point in 1802. Why, then, did it take this maritime nation 43 more years to create a similar school for the navy? Leeman examines the origins of the United States Naval Academy and the national debate that led to its founding. Considering the development of the naval officer corps in relation to American notions of democracy and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Leeman, William P.
Long road to Annapolis.
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2010
(DLC) 2009044822
(OCoLC)441211320
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: William P Leeman
ISBN: 9780807895825 0807895822 9781469604039 1469604035
OCLC Number: 656857206
Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 292 pages) : illustrations
Contents: Introduction : armed ambassadors --
Prologue : the maddest idea in the world --
Defending the New Republic --
Learning the ropes --
A West Point for the Navy? --
Academies and aristocracy in Andrew Jackson's America --
The sword and the pen --
Mutiny, midshipmen, and the middle class --
Annapolis --
Epilogue : homecoming.
Responsibility: William P. Leeman.

Abstract:

The United States established an academy for educating future army officers at West Point in 1802. Why, then, did it take this maritime nation forty-three more years to create a similar school for  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Well-written, crisp and effectively organized. . . . Leeman has painted a picture of the maturing nation's divide between those who were satisfied with time-honored methods of military training and Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/656857206>
library:oclcnum"656857206"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/656857206>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010107069>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Political culture--United States--History--19th century."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2009123117>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Democracy and education--United States--History--19th century."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:copyrightYear"2010"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2010"
schema:description"The United States established an academy for educating future army officers at West Point in 1802. Why, then, did it take this maritime nation 43 more years to create a similar school for the navy? Leeman examines the origins of the United States Naval Academy and the national debate that led to its founding. Considering the development of the naval officer corps in relation to American notions of democracy and aristocracy, Leeman's analysis sheds new light on the often competing ways Americans perceived their navy and their nation during the first half of the nineteenth century."@en
schema:description"Introduction : armed ambassadors -- Prologue : the maddest idea in the world -- Defending the New Republic -- Learning the ropes -- A West Point for the Navy? -- Academies and aristocracy in Andrew Jackson's America -- The sword and the pen -- Mutiny, midshipmen, and the middle class -- Annapolis -- Epilogue : homecoming."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/796240468>
schema:genre"Electronic books."@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The long road to Annapolis the founding of the Naval Academy and the emerging American republic"@en
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:url<http://site.ebrary.com/id/10405055>
schema:url<http://muse.jhu.edu/books/9781469604039/>
schema:url<http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=330156>
schema:url<http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807895825_Leeman>
schema:url<http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=565699>
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.