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Lords of the land : indigenous property rights and the jurisprudence of empire

Author: Mark Hickford
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011. ©2011
Series: Oxford studies in modern legal history.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Through focusing on the political history of New Zealand during its imperial settlement, this book offers a fresh assessment of the history of indigenous property rights. It shows how native title became a constitutional frame within which political authority was formed and contested at the heart of empire and the colonial peripheries.
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Hickford
ISBN: 9780199568659 0199568650 9780199568659 0199568650
OCLC Number: 751732285
Description: xxiii, 523 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Preliminaries --
An empire of variations : problems of settlement and the property rights of indigenous populations --
Incredulity from a distance : disputing the content of indigenous proprietary entitlements, 1840 to 1844 --
"Vague native rights to land" : constitutionalism, native title, and pursuing settling spaces, 1844-1853 --
Extricating "native title from its present entanglement" : recognizing diversity and the problem of a liberal constitution --
Exploring the dynamics and consequences of "occasional association" --
"Tribunals independent of a prince", 1859-1862 : exploring the dynamics and consequences of "occasional association", part II --
Conclusions: Constitutional design and the Treaty of Waitangi : balanced constitutions, native title, and the normativity of political constitutionalism. 1. Preliminaries --
Overture --
forging native title in an empire of variations, 1837 to 1862 --
Chapter outline --
Three key ingredients --
non-justiciability, conceptual incommensurability, or jurisdictional incommensurability: the pre-eminence of politics and political constitutionalism in the making of native title --
The dynamism of native title --
the politics of negotiability and the jurisprudence of empire --
`Lords of the Land' --
mid-nineteenth-century New Zealand was not a place for `Banal Constitutionalism' --
Unravelling and reframing Maori constitutional and political thought on territorial rights --
2. An Empire of Variations: Problems of Settlement and the Property Rights of Indigenous Populations --
Seeing native title through stadialism and ius gentium entwined --
Trails of transmission to a particular colony and the relevance of empire --
A New Zealand Association advocating `Systematic Colonization' --
From Association to Company --
A corporation acquiring territories --
Several proclamations and a treaty --
Conclusion: conversing with a corporation --
3. Incredulity from a Distance: Disputing the Content of Indigenous Proprietary Entitlements, 1840 to 1844 --
Disciplining `Adventurers Without Law': the uses of ius gentium, 1840 to 1844 --
Unsettling intelligence, `Disciplining Moments', and the extent of native title --
Conclusion --
4. 'Vague Native Rights to Land': Constitutionalism, Native Title, and Pursuing Settling Spaces, 1844-1853 --
Interrogating customs and sources of unease --
Custom and its discontents, part I --
Buller, Stanley, Hope, and Howick --
Denouement: two Greys and the survival of `Occupancy', 1845-1853 --
Symonds contextualized --
Placing the Treaty of Waitangi --
native title and court decisions as a resource for colonial government disciplining subjects --
Whither the Treaty of Waitangi? The conditionality of United States jurisprudence applied to New Zealand --
Custom and its discontents, part II --
Martin, Merivale, and the third Earl Grey --
The Wesleyan Missionary Society, the incidents of native title, and living with abstract disagreement --
The Aborigines' Protection Society --
`Magisterial Jurisdiction' and `Territorial Jurisdiction' --
Modus vivendi and proprietary rights --
the politics of negotiability and living with indeterminacy --
New Zealand's lost whig foundations --
diversity and balance in a `Baroque' constitution --
Institutional pluralism, constitutional adjustment, and native title --
constitutions as process and negotiability --
Native title illuminating British political debates about colonial constitutional design --
Conclusions --
5. Extricating `Native Title from its Present Entanglement' --
Recognizing Diversity and the Problem of a Liberal Constitution --
A jurisprudence in the shadows --
balanced constitutions and native title --
Jurisdictional incommensurability, conceptual incommensurability, and non-justiciability --
the electoral franchise and native title --
Jurisdictional incommensurability continued --
a board of inquiry in 1856 --
`They are all entangled or matted together' --
Constitutional condominium or consociation --
reconceiving Crown-Maori relations in colonial New Zealand --
This `Tendency to Self-Organization' --
colonial administration looking for inroads, intersections, and uptake --
The philosophy and political economy of individualizing native title through Crown grants --
1856-1860 --
How to transform native title --
indigenous communities as vectors of, and volunteers for, change --
The necessity for courts to investigate native title --
`Negotiations and diplomatism will have no force, and no public support' --
State-building and experimentation --
the Native Territorial Rights Bill and the `Exclusive use and occupancy of any lands' --
'No well-defined law' to guide and 'Exclusive use and occupancy' --
Fashioning statutory windows of communicability between indigenous custom and English law --
`How to reconcile this work of civilization with the fair claims and rights of the natives is the problem which the Government has to solve' --
Conclusions --
6. Exploring the Dynamics and Consequences of `Occasional Association' --
The metaphor and problem of `Occasional association' --
`Occasional negociation' and the metaphor of `Occasional Association' --
an extended essay in two parts --
pt. I The Native Council Bill of 1860 --
an exceptional experiment in legislative design and imperial constitutionalism --
Governing subjects as strangers and legislative design --
double government, British South Asia, the Cape Colony, and New Zealand --
pt. II The Conditionality of the introduced colonial constitution --
the revival and denouement of an imperial native council option --
`The incorporation of the two races in one body politic' --
letters patent and an imperial native council: native title, administering native districts, and the levers of imperial military assistance and funding --
An imperial native council option confounded --
the second cut --
Conclusions --
a study in failure --
7. `Tribunals Independent of a Prince', 1859-1862 --
Exploring the Dynamics and Consequences of `Occasional Association', Part II --
`Whatever may be the true theory of native tenure' --
of native title, mana, and seignorial rights --
Negotiations for the acquisition of the Pekapeka block in Waitara, 1859 and 1860 --
Warring memoranda --
setting the scene --
Indigenous orders, the conditionality of the introduced colonial constitution, and the three sticks of law, the divine being, and the mana of New Zealand in disunion --
Constitutional reflections --
living with indeterminacy and disagreement --
Communal or tribal rights, political autonomy, and rights of government as a parochial and trans-oceanic theme --
the political constitutionalism of native title, New Zealand, Algeria, and the law of nations --
`It seems agreed that native title is marvellously complex' --
Casting Waitara as a constitutional moment --
Martin's The Taranaki Question and a beginning to the warring of pamphlets --
`A country without law and a prince' --
the Treaty as an usher for rights-talk; individual and collective rights --
Who interprets? --
`Tribunals independent of the prince' and the meanings of the Treaty of Waitangi --
The Native Land Court, 1861-1862: a `Title Sifted Through' a statutory tribunal --
8. Conclusions --
Constitutional Design and the Treaty of Waitangi: Balanced Constitutions, Native Title, and the Normativity of Political Constitutionalism.
Series Title: Oxford studies in modern legal history.
Responsibility: Mark Hickford.
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Abstract:

Through focusing on the political history of New Zealand during its imperial settlement, this book offers a fresh assessment of the history of indigenous property rights. It shows how native title  Read more...

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It encapsulates an immense effort of legal archaeology ... excavating the messy contingences of actual colonial policy and practice on indigenous land rights from the archival records of the time ... Read more...

 
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