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Louise Anderson oral history interview : tape and transcript, 1999

Author: Louise Anderson; Ancella Radford Bickley; Rita Wicks-Nelson; Marshall University. Oral History of Appalachia Program.
Edition/Format:   Book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Mrs. Louise Anderson taught at Washington High School, Cedar Grove High School, and East Bank. One of the main topics of this interview is her family, which she discusses in detail throughout the interview; this includes her immediate family, grandparents and relatives, her children, and her husband (his death is discussed as well). Another topic is her education, both grade school and college, and teachers she  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Oral histories
Named Person: Louise Anderson
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Louise Anderson; Ancella Radford Bickley; Rita Wicks-Nelson; Marshall University. Oral History of Appalachia Program.
OCLC Number: 690019152
Notes: This interview is one of series conducted concerning Oral Histories of African-American women who taught in West Virginia public schools.
Description: Tape: sound tape reel. Transcript: 110 p.
Responsibility: conducted by Rita Wicks-Nelson and Ancella Radford Bickley.

Abstract:

Mrs. Louise Anderson taught at Washington High School, Cedar Grove High School, and East Bank. One of the main topics of this interview is her family, which she discusses in detail throughout the interview; this includes her immediate family, grandparents and relatives, her children, and her husband (his death is discussed as well). Another topic is her education, both grade school and college, and teachers she admired. Some of the schools she attended were Washington High School (an African-American school in London, West Virginia, which was a community center at the time of the interview), Knoxville College, and Bluefield State College. She also played basketball in high school. She also discusses her childhood, including a brief section on Christmas, families she knew, community life and communities she lived in (including a coal mining town named Cannelton Hollow, in Fayette and Kanawha County, and also Cedar Grove, WV). Education in general is another emphasis, including memories of the desegregation of schools, the West Virginia Education Association, and a state-wide contest for business students (held at Bluefield State College). Other topics she discusses are: the Civil Rights Movement and her feelings on feminism; religion and churches; segregation and the racial integration of a department store; a brief section on politics and politicians such as Bill Clinton; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; reflections on her life; a very brief section on Jesse Jackson; the educational situation with African-Americans; her views on young people; as well as several other topics.

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