skip to content
Louise Fitzhugh Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Louise Fitzhugh

Author: Virginia L Wolf
Publisher: New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1991.
Series: Twayne's United States authors series, TUSAS 589.; Twayne's United States authors series., Children's literature.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Louise Fitzhugh, a major innovator in realistic fiction for children, stunned the book world with her challenging 1964 novel Harriet the Spy. An individualist who satirized conformity in all her books--among them Sport, Nobody's Family Is Going to Change, and Bang, Bang, You're Dead--Fitzhugh created memorable protagonists who consistently resist deadening familial and societal conventions. Although her novels  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Wolf, Virginia L.
Louise Fitzhugh.
New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, c1991
(OCoLC)551700995
Online version:
Wolf, Virginia L.
Louise Fitzhugh.
New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, c1991
(OCoLC)610043700
Named Person: Louise Fitzhugh; Louise Fitzhugh; Louise Fitzhugh
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Virginia L Wolf
ISBN: 0805776141 9780805776140
OCLC Number: 23972239
Description: xx, 152 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Portrait of the Artist as an Outsider --
2. The Range of the Artist: Pictures, Collaborations, and Picture Books --
3. Portrait of the Artist as a Girl: Harriet the Spy --
4. Portrait of the Artist as a Girl: The Long Secret --
5. Harriet's Mistakes as an Artist: Nobody's Family Is Going to Change --
6. Beth Ellen's Mistakes as an Artist: Sport --
7. The Contribution of the Artist: Fitzhugh's Importance and Influence.
Series Title: Twayne's United States authors series, TUSAS 589.; Twayne's United States authors series., Children's literature.
Responsibility: Virginia L. Wolf.
More information:

Abstract:

Louise Fitzhugh, a major innovator in realistic fiction for children, stunned the book world with her challenging 1964 novel Harriet the Spy. An individualist who satirized conformity in all her books--among them Sport, Nobody's Family Is Going to Change, and Bang, Bang, You're Dead--Fitzhugh created memorable protagonists who consistently resist deadening familial and societal conventions. Although her novels celebrate independence and self-knowledge, the absence of intimacy in Fitzhugh's fictional world also suggests the tragedy of individualism; her work thus serves as a subtle critique of contemporary American society, where neither outsider nor conformist is truly happy. In this first book-length study of Fitzhugh's published works, Virginia L. Wolf introduces new biographical information and explores the complex relationship between Fitzhugh's life and art. Wolf enhances our understanding of the homosexual artist by tracing the autobiographical sources of Fitzhugh's major themes and inspirations: alienation, the family, individualism, conformity, religion, war, and bigotry. In this careful examination of Fitzhugh's feminism and lesbianism, Wolf emphasizes the revolutionary, iconoclastic positions championed by Fitzhugh and her characters. These hitherto unexamined issues provide a unique new insight into Fitzhugh's accomplishments and further our understanding of her contribution to children's literature.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/23972239>
library:oclcnum"23972239"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/23972239>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008100467>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Children--Books and reading--United States--History--20th century."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008100444>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Children's stories, American--History and criticism."@en
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"1991"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1991"
schema:description"1. Portrait of the Artist as an Outsider -- 2. The Range of the Artist: Pictures, Collaborations, and Picture Books -- 3. Portrait of the Artist as a Girl: Harriet the Spy -- 4. Portrait of the Artist as a Girl: The Long Secret -- 5. Harriet's Mistakes as an Artist: Nobody's Family Is Going to Change -- 6. Beth Ellen's Mistakes as an Artist: Sport -- 7. The Contribution of the Artist: Fitzhugh's Importance and Influence."@en
schema:description"Louise Fitzhugh, a major innovator in realistic fiction for children, stunned the book world with her challenging 1964 novel Harriet the Spy. An individualist who satirized conformity in all her books--among them Sport, Nobody's Family Is Going to Change, and Bang, Bang, You're Dead--Fitzhugh created memorable protagonists who consistently resist deadening familial and societal conventions. Although her novels celebrate independence and self-knowledge, the absence of intimacy in Fitzhugh's fictional world also suggests the tragedy of individualism; her work thus serves as a subtle critique of contemporary American society, where neither outsider nor conformist is truly happy. In this first book-length study of Fitzhugh's published works, Virginia L. Wolf introduces new biographical information and explores the complex relationship between Fitzhugh's life and art. Wolf enhances our understanding of the homosexual artist by tracing the autobiographical sources of Fitzhugh's major themes and inspirations: alienation, the family, individualism, conformity, religion, war, and bigotry. In this careful examination of Fitzhugh's feminism and lesbianism, Wolf emphasizes the revolutionary, iconoclastic positions championed by Fitzhugh and her characters. These hitherto unexamined issues provide a unique new insight into Fitzhugh's accomplishments and further our understanding of her contribution to children's literature."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/25194857>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Louise Fitzhugh"@en
schema:numberOfPages"152"
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.