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Lucretia Mott's heresy : abolition and women's rights in nineteenth-century America

Author: Carol Faulkner
Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biographie
Nonfiction
Biography
History
Named Person: Lucretia Mott; Lucretia Mott; Lucretia Mott; Lucretia Mott; Lucretia Mott
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Carol Faulkner
ISBN: 9780812243215 0812243218
OCLC Number: 696092180
Description: 291 p., [8] pages of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Heretic and saint --
Nantucket --
Nine partners --
Schism --
Immediate abolition --
Pennsylvania Hall --
Abroad --
Crisis --
The year 1848 --
Conventions --
Fugitives --
Civil War --
Peace.
Responsibility: Carol Faulkner.
More information:

Abstract:

Lucretia Mott was a central figure in the interconnected struggles for racial and sexual equality in nineteenth-century America. This biography, the first in thirty years, focuses on Mott's long and  Read more...

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"This is the first biography of Mott in thirty years, and it proves to be thoroughly researched, well written, and fascinating. Faulkner's accessible writing style makes this book appropriate for any Read more...

 
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schema:description""Lucretia Coffin Mott was one of the most famous and controversial women in nineteenth-century America. Now overshadowed by abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison and feminists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mott was viewed in her time as a dominant figure in the dual struggles for racial and sexual equality. History has often depicted her as a gentle Quaker lady and a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians, urban mobs, and her fellow Quakers. In the first biography of Mott in thirty years, historian Carol Faulkner reveals the motivations of this radical egalitarian from Nantucket. Mott's deep faith and ties to the Society of Friends do not fully explain her activism- her roots in post-Revolutionary New England also shaped her views on slavery, patriarchy, and the church, as well as her expansive interests in peace, temperance, prison reform, religious freedom, and Native American rights. While Mott was known as the 'moving spirit' of the first women's rights convention at Seneca Falls, her commitment to women's rights never trumped her support for abolition or racial equality. She envisioned women's rights not as a new and separate movement but rather as an extension of the universal principles of liberty and equality. Mott was among the first white Americans to call for an immediate end to slavery. Her long-term collaboration with white and black women in the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society was remarkable by any standards. This book reintroduces readers to an amazing woman whose work and ideas inspired the transformation of American society."-- From publisher's description."@en
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