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Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South : race, identity, and the making of a nation

Author: Malinda Maynor Lowery
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2010.
Series: First peoples (2010)
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
With more than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River. Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation. They did so  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lowery, Malinda Maynor.
Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South.
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010
(OCoLC)747305639
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Malinda Maynor Lowery
ISBN: 9780807833681 0807833681 9780807871119 0807871117
OCLC Number: 441211328
Description: xxvi, 339 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Adapting to segregation --
Making home and making leaders --
Taking sides --
Confronting the New Deal --
Pembroke Farms : gaining economic autonomy --
Measuring identity --
Recognizing the Lumbee --
Conclusion : creating a Lumbee and Tuscarora future.
Series Title: First peoples (2010)
Responsibility: Malinda Maynor Lowery.

Abstract:

With over 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River. This title describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s,  Read more...

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"The book's richness, wide range of archival sources, and complex treatment of identity make it an important work for scholars and teachers interested in both southern and Indian Read more...

 
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