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Lure and loathing : essays on race, identity, and the ambivalence of assimilation

Author: Gerald Lyn Early
Publisher: New York : A. Lane/Penguin Press, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The history of the American Negro is the history of strife ... The Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second sight in this American world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his twoness - an  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lure and loathing.
New York : Allen Lane, The Penguin Press, 1993
(OCoLC)607835576
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gerald Lyn Early
ISBN: 0670841854 9780670841851 0713991011 9780713991017
OCLC Number: 26673771
Description: xxiv, 351 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Free at last? : a personal perspective on race and identity in America / Glenn C. Loury --
Sushi and grits : ethnic identity and conflict in a newly multicultural America / Itabari Njeri --
The last great battle of the West : W.E.B. Du Bois and the struggle for African America's soul / Alton B. Pollard, III --
The black table, the empty seat, and the tie / Stephen L. Carter --
Who are we? Where did we come from? Where are we going? / Stanley Crouch --
Confessions of a wannabe Negro / Reginald McKnight --
Black is the noun / Nikki Giovanni --
Racism, consciousness, and Afrocentricity / Molefi Kete Asante --The welcome table / Henry Louis Gates, Jr. --
Off-timing : stepping to the different drummer / Kristin Hunter Lattany --
Junior and John Doe / James McPherson --
The Du Boisian dubiety and the American dilemma : two levels of lure and loathing / C. Eric Lincoln --
Primal orb density / Wanda Coleman --
The illusion of racial equality : the Black American dilemma / Robert Staples --
Patriots / Anthony Walton --
Du Bois's dilemma and African American adaptiveness / Ella Pearson Mitchell --
Ambivalent maybe / Wilson J. Moses --
Deep sight and rescue missions / Toni Cade Bambara --
Race, science, and identity / Kenneth R. Manning --
"In the kingdom of culture" : Black women and the intersection of race, gender, and class / Darlene Clark Hine.
Responsibility: edited and with an introduction by Gerald Early.

Abstract:

"The history of the American Negro is the history of strife ... The Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second sight in this American world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his twoness - an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder." W.E.B. Du Bois, perhaps one of the greatest intellectuals in American history, wrote this famous passage nearly a century ago in his classic book, The Souls of Black Folk. It still remains the most timely, the most quoted, and, in some ways, the most misunderstood appraisal ever written of the tenuous psychological position of the black in America. Have we really come to understand what Du Bois was talking about? Was Du Bois himself clear in what he meant? What does he mean true self-consciousness? What are the gender implications that seem to identify the dilemma of the Negro with that of the oppressed male only? In short, how does self-consciousness relate to ethnicity and race? Now twenty leading African-American intellectuals address those words by Du Bois and reconsider their complex implications in the chill light of the 1990s in what promises to be a landmark volume in the literature of race and ethnicity. The contributors to Lure and Loathing represent a cross-section of African-American thought: here are Nikki Giovanni and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Pulitzer Prize-winner James McPherson and Yale law professor Stephen L. Carter; here are the distinguished journalist Itabari Njeri and the playwright, poet and essayist, Stanley Crouch; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's professor of Rhetoric and the History of Science, Kenneth R. Manning, and the novelist and short story writer, Toni Cade Bambara. These and many others are here, writing with vast originality and candor about the "lure and loathing" that characterize the experience of black people in white America. Together, they have produced a book that will galvanize, stimulate - and sometimes discomfort - readers both black and white, now and for years to come.

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