skip to content
The macroeconomic effects of tax changes : estimates based on a new measure of fiscal shocks Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The macroeconomic effects of tax changes : estimates based on a new measure of fiscal shocks

Author: Christina Romer; David Romer; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, MA : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2007.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online), working paper no. 13264.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This paper investigates the impact of changes in the level of taxation on economic activity. We use the narrative record -- presidential speeches, executive-branch documents, and Congressional reports -- to identify the size, timing, and principal motivation for all major postwar tax policy actions. This narrative analysis allows us to separate revenue changes resulting from legislation from changes occurring for  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Christina Romer; David Romer; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 156912219
Notes: Title from PDF file as viewed on 8/16/2007.
Description: 1 online resource.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online), working paper no. 13264.
Responsibility: Christina D. Romer, David H. Romer.

Abstract:

"This paper investigates the impact of changes in the level of taxation on economic activity. We use the narrative record -- presidential speeches, executive-branch documents, and Congressional reports -- to identify the size, timing, and principal motivation for all major postwar tax policy actions. This narrative analysis allows us to separate revenue changes resulting from legislation from changes occurring for other reasons. It also allows us to further separate legislated changes into those taken for reasons related to prospective economic conditions, such as countercyclical actions and tax changes tied to changes in government spending, and those taken for more exogenous reasons, such as to reduce an inherited budget deficit or to promote long-run growth. We then examine the behavior of output following these more exogenous legislated changes. The resulting estimates indicate that tax increases are highly contractionary. The effects are strongly significant, highly robust, and much larger than those obtained using broader measures of tax changes. The large effect stems in considerable part from a powerful negative effect of tax increases on investment. We also find that legislated tax increases designed to reduce a persistent budget deficit appear to have much smaller output costs than other tax increases"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/156912219>
library:oclcnum"156912219"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:valueUnknown value: dct
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/901797>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Economic development--Econometric models."@en
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"2007"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2007"
schema:description""This paper investigates the impact of changes in the level of taxation on economic activity. We use the narrative record -- presidential speeches, executive-branch documents, and Congressional reports -- to identify the size, timing, and principal motivation for all major postwar tax policy actions. This narrative analysis allows us to separate revenue changes resulting from legislation from changes occurring for other reasons. It also allows us to further separate legislated changes into those taken for reasons related to prospective economic conditions, such as countercyclical actions and tax changes tied to changes in government spending, and those taken for more exogenous reasons, such as to reduce an inherited budget deficit or to promote long-run growth. We then examine the behavior of output following these more exogenous legislated changes. The resulting estimates indicate that tax increases are highly contractionary. The effects are strongly significant, highly robust, and much larger than those obtained using broader measures of tax changes. The large effect stems in considerable part from a powerful negative effect of tax increases on investment. We also find that legislated tax increases designed to reduce a persistent budget deficit appear to have much smaller output costs than other tax increases"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/227242788>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"The macroeconomic effects of tax changes estimates based on a new measure of fiscal shocks"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:url<http://0-papers.nber.org.biblio.eui.eu/papers/>
schema:url<http://papers.nber.org/papers/w13264>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.