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Making enemies : war and state building in Burma

Author: Mary P Callahan
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2005.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Burmese army took political power in Burma in 1962 and has ruled the country ever since. The persistence of this government--even in the face of long-term nonviolent opposition led by activist Aung San Suu Kyi, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991--has puzzled scholars. In a book relevant to current debates about democratization, Mary P. Callahan seeks to explain the extraordinary durability of the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Callahan, Mary P. (Mary Patricia), 1961-
Making enemies.
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press ; Bristol : University Presses Marketing [distributor], 2005
(OCoLC)62089211
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Mary P Callahan
ISBN: 0801472679 9780801472671
OCLC Number: 924274340
Notes: "First printing Cornell Paperback 2005"--Title page verso.
Originally published: 2003.
Description: 1 online resource (xx, 268 pages :) illustrations, maps.
Other Titles: War and state building in Burma
Responsibility: Mary P. Callahan.

Abstract:

The Burmese army took political power in Burma in 1962 and has ruled the country ever since. The persistence of this government--even in the face of long-term nonviolent opposition led by activist Aung San Suu Kyi, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991--has puzzled scholars. In a book relevant to current debates about democratization, Mary P. Callahan seeks to explain the extraordinary durability of the Burmese military regime. In her view, the origins of army rule are to be found in the relationship between war and state formation.Burma's colonial past had seen a large imbalance between the military and civil sectors. That imbalance was accentuated soon after formal independence by one of the earliest and most persistent covert Cold War conflicts, involving CIA-funded Kuomintang incursions across the Burmese border into the People's Republic of China. Because this raised concerns in Rangoon about the possibility of a showdown with Communist China, the Burmese Army received even more autonomy and funding to protect the integrity of the new nation-state.The military transformed itself during the late 1940s and the 1950s from a group of anticolonial guerrilla bands into the professional force that seized power in 1962. The army edged out all other state and social institutions in the competition for national power. Making Enemies draws upon Callahan's interviews with former military officers and her archival work in Burmese libraries and halls of power. Callahan's unparalleled access allows her to correct existing explanations of Burmese authoritarianism and to supply new information about the coups of 1958 and 1962.
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