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The making of modern science : science, technology, medicine and modernity : 1789-1914

Author: David M Knight
Publisher: Cambridge, UK : Polity, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Of all the inventions of the nineteenth century, the scientist is one of the most striking. In revolutionary France the science student, taught by men active in research, was born; and a generation later, the graduate student doing a PhD emerged in Germany. In 1833 the word "scientist" was coined; forty years later science (increasingly specialised) was a becoming a profession. Men of science rivalled clerics and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David M Knight
ISBN: 9780745636757 0745636756 9780745636764 0745636764
OCLC Number: 430510717
Description: xii, 370 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction : approaching the past --
Science in and after 1789 --
Science and its languages --
Applied science --
Intellectual excitement --
Healthy lives --
Laboratories --
Bodies, minds and spirits --
The time of triumph --
Science and national identities --
Method and heresy --
Cultural leadership --
Into the new century.
Responsibility: David Knight.

Abstract:

Of all the inventions of the nineteenth century, the scientist is one of the most striking. This book brings together the people, events, and discoveries of this period into a narrative. It is of  Read more...

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"Knight loves science and he loves history. This work is a splendid example of how to communicate that enthusiasm." British Journal for the History of Science "A fine synthesis, the fruit of a Read more...

 
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