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A man to match his mountains : Badshah Khan, nonviolent soldier of Islam

Author: Easwaran Eknath
Publisher: Petaluma, Calif. : Nilgiri Press, ©1984.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Realizing that Westerners tend to associate Islam with terrorism and nonviolence with Hinduism, Easwaran (Gandhi, the Man) set out to write a tribute to a Muslim who embodied the nonviolent tradition within Islam. Badshah Khan, a Pathan of the former Northwest Frontier Province of India (today, the Taliban of Afghanistan), raised an army of 100,000 unarmed "Servants of God" and later became one of Gandhi's closest  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Easwaran, Eknath.
Man to match his mountains.
Petaluma, Calif. : Nilgiri Press, ©1984
(OCoLC)566303469
Named Person: Abdul Ghaffar Khan; Abdul Ghaffar Khan; Abdul Ghaffar Khan
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Easwaran Eknath
ISBN: 0915132338 9780915132331 0915132346 9780915132348
OCLC Number: 11236175
Description: 240 pages, [2] leaves of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Responsibility: by Eknath Easwaran ; with an afterword by Timothy Flinders.

Abstract:

Realizing that Westerners tend to associate Islam with terrorism and nonviolence with Hinduism, Easwaran (Gandhi, the Man) set out to write a tribute to a Muslim who embodied the nonviolent tradition within Islam. Badshah Khan, a Pathan of the former Northwest Frontier Province of India (today, the Taliban of Afghanistan), raised an army of 100,000 unarmed "Servants of God" and later became one of Gandhi's closest companions. Khan and his followers endured a great deal of persecution and imprisonment under the oppressive British rule, thus challenging the myth that passive resistance always works for those who are already peaceful. Though Khan was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, far too few people are aware of the man who was known as the "Frontier Gandhi."

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