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Management of the absurd : paradoxes in leadership

Author: Richard Evans Farson
Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Facile formulas, catchy slogans, ten-step programs, and quick fixes too often dominate today's management training programs. But in organizations as in all of life, human behavior is seldom predictable, and business dilemmas do not easily lend themselves to gimmicks or simplistic answers. In Management of the Absurd, psychologist, educator, and former CEO Richard Farson presents a series of management paradoxes  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Evans Farson
ISBN: 0684800802 9780684800806
OCLC Number: 33078278
Description: 172 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: pt. 1. A different way of thinking. The opposite of a profound truth is also true --
Nothing is as invisible as the obvious --
pt. 2. The "technology" of human relations. The more important a relationship, the less skill matters --
Once you find a management technique that works, give it up --
Effective managers are not in control --
Most problems that people have are not problems --
Technology creates the opposite of its intended purpose --
We think we invent technology, but technology also invents up --
pt. 3. The paradoxes of communication. The more we communicate, the less we communicate --
In communication, form is more important than content --
Listening is more difficult than talking --
Praising people does not motivate them --
pt. 4. The politics of management. Every act is a political act --
The best resource for the solution of any problem is the person or group that presents the problem --
pt. 5. Organizational predicaments. Organizations that need help most will benefit from it least --
Individuals are almost indestructible, but organizations are very fragile --
The better things are, the worse they feel --
pt. 6. Dilemmas of change. We think we want creativity or change, but we really don't --
We want for ourselves not what we are missing, but more of what we already have --
Big changes are easier to make than small ones --
We learn not from our failures but from our successes --
and the failures of others --
Everything we try works, and nothing works --
Planning is an ineffective way to bring about change --
Organizations change most by surviving calamities --
People we think need changing are pretty good the way they are --
pt. 7. The aesthetics of leadership. Every great strength is a great weakness --
Morale is unrelated to productivity --
There are no leaders, there is only leadership --
The more experienced the managers, the more they trust simple intuition --
Leaders cannot be trained, but they can be educated --
In management, to be a professional one must be an amateur --
pt. 8. Avoiding the future. Lost causes are the only ones worth fighting for --
My advice is don't take my advice.
Responsibility: by Richard Farson ; foreword by Michael Crichton.
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Abstract:

The most thoughtful book on management since Max Dupree's Leadership Is an Art, this contrarian approach challenges leaders to look past trendy quick fixes and facile formulas and deal with the real  Read more...

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David T. Mclaughlin "Chairman, The Aspen Institute Former President, Dartmouth College"Management of the Absurd" is a delightfully irreverent book that addresses the real truths of management at an Read more...

 
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